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Friday, October 5
 

2:00pm EDT

Toxic Tango (An Off-Site Performance at LaSalle Park)
TOXIC TANGO In this site-specific performance at a toxic super fund site in South Bend, Fink, clad in a gigantic red dress, will release a rusty-red substance  from her crotch, marking the space in the way a toxic dump site is marked, in the fashion of a woman or a planet bleeding to death, in the manner of a macho expressionist painter-boy in queer femme drag. A red giant, a dead planet. The red dress is a continuation of Laffin's infamous, sculptural, and monumental series of feminist interventions into body art. Laffin will be remotely reading a text broadcast out of Fink's crotch (and of Fink's authorship) in which the earth accuses the toxic dumpers of dumping her. She wants revenge on this suckiest of sucky boyfriends. The red will first alter and then eventually consume the site. Intoxicated, the site will be left marked red, both sutured and torn by the performance.  Mutual surrogacy, feminist interdependence, anthropocene survival skills, #metoo queer/femme rage and a remarking of the marred earth are the forms this performative inscription will take in this continuation of Laffin's and Fink's year-long sequence of environmental/crip performances. The audience will be invited to take home a toxic souvenirs: baggies of red/earth//toxic/crotch/rage. The earth will be left cleaner. But redder. Gorgeous and  ugly, monumental and intimate, political and personal, spoken wordy and visual, hilarious, deadly serious and just plain deadly, this performance will reinscribe what we think we’re doing when we write bodies, women, and planets. Running time: half hour/permanent/ephemeral. Directions from Snite Museum to LaSalle Park: https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Snite+Museum+of+Art,+100+Moose+Krause+Circle,+Notre+Dame,+IN+46556/N+Falcon+St,+South+Bend,+IN/@41.6807498,-86.2984357,15z/data=!4m14!4m13!1m5!1m1!1s0x8816d29e251d489d:0x93e29cc4b73cb6a9!2m2!1d-86.2356991!2d41.6995878!1m5!1m1!1s0x8811328aa77db46b:0x9787fd8e70329bb2!2m2!1d-86.2973739!2d41.6791739!3e0

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Natalya Fink

Jennifer Natalya Fink

Georgetown University
Jennifer Natalya Fink is the author of five critically acclaimed novels, including the Dana Award-winning The Mikvah Queen and Lambda-finalist and Doctorow-prize winning Bhopal Dance. She is an associate professor at Georgetown University, where she teaches creative writing and co-founded... Read More →
JL

Julie Laffin

Georgetown University
Julie Laffin is an artist living in northern Illinois whose work often draws on her previous body-based performance work with huge gowns and her current condition of being severely environmentally ill. Unable to perform works of a spectacular nature in public for the past 14 years... Read More →


Friday October 5, 2018 2:00pm - 2:45pm EDT
LaSalle Park 3419 W Washington St, South Bend, IN 46619

5:45pm EDT

Opening Reception and Registration
Festival registration, bar, festival opening exhibit by Lance and Andi Olsen.

Friday October 5, 2018 5:45pm - 7:00pm EDT
Snite Museum of Art

6:00pm EDT

Exhibition Opening: There’s No Place Like Time: retrospective of video artist Alana Olsen A Collaborative, Multimodal Installation by Lance & Andi Olsen
There’s No Place Like Time is a novel you can walk through. It takes the form of a real retrospective of videos dedicated to the career of Alana Olsen, one of America’s most overlooked experimental video artists who never existed. An interplay of videos, texts, books, and interventions, There's No Place Like Time forms a multimodal installation that translates Alana’s life (which began as a fictional character in Lance Olsen's novel, Theories of Forgetting, 2014) into a three-dimensional reality.
 
From Alana Olsen’s videos and the language surrounding them (including a full-length fictional catalogue) you are invited to infer her development, obsessions, and relationship with her equally fictive daughter, Aila, a Berlin art critic and conceptual artist who curates the exhibit. There’s No Place Like Time remembers an oeuvre of fewer than 20 videos (some which are already missing) that span roughly four decades and have—despite the paucity of their numbers­­—influenced artists as varied as Lars von Trier, Douglas Gordon, and Martin Arnold.

Speakers
avatar for Lance Olsen

Lance Olsen

Professor & Author, University of Utah
Lance Olsen is author of more than 25 books of and about innovative writing, including, most recently, the novel Dreamlives of Debris (Dzanc, 2017). A Guggenheim, Berlin Prize, D.A.A.D. Artist-in-Berlin Residency, N.E.A. Fellowship, and Pushcart Prize recipient, as well as a Fulbright... Read More →
AO

Andi Olsen

Andi Olsen is a video artist whose works have been shown in museums, galleries and film festivals in the U.S. and Europe. She is known for her assemblages and hybrid works that combine literature, video and objects.  


Friday October 5, 2018 6:00pm - 7:00pm EDT
Snite Museum of Art

7:00pm EDT

Featured Reading by Douglas Kearney
Douglas Kearney has published six books, most recently, Buck Studies (Fence Books, 2016), winner of the Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Prize, the CLMP Firecracker Award for Poetry, and silver medalist for the California Book Award (Poetry). BOMB says: “[Buck Studies] remaps the 20th century in a project that is both lyrical and epic, personal and historical.”

Speakers
DK

Douglas Kearney

Douglas Kearney has published six books, most recently, Buck Studies (Fence Books, 2016), winner of the Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Prize, the CLMP Firecracker Award for Poetry, and silver medalist for the California Book Award (Poetry). BOMB says: “[Buck Studies] remaps the... Read More →


Friday October 5, 2018 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
Annenberg Auditorium of the Snite Museum of Art
 
Saturday, October 6
 

9:00am EDT

Counter-Desecration: Critical Making for Catastrophic Times
In catastrophic times, new collectivies emerge & respond. The issue of intervention into the dominant and destructive narratives of progress that rule our age is taken up in Anna Tsing’s The Mushroom at the End of the World, where she envisions collaboration as a means of reimagining and remaking the future. Her emphasis on biological resurgence compels us to consider how we might reorganize our own social processes – as writers, as collectivities of (re)writers, and as writers-with – to generate new meanings and actions, to shift the narrative and its frames. This reading presents participants in Counter-Desecration: a Glossary for Writing within the Anthropocene (Wesleyan UP, 2018), a collaborative intervention that responds to the need to critically and creatively inhabit our new political and ecological realities. The contributors’ words – 135 common terms, repurposed words, and neologisms – map new perspectives that together provide ways to approach the interlinked social, economic, and environmental forces that shape us, the places we live, and our relationship to them, to each other, and to other species. As Allison Adelle Hedge Coke writes in her Preface, “Counter-Desecration brings sustenance and power with terms made in collective remedying.” What makes Counter-Desecration unique among contemporary anthropocene glossary projects is the brevity of the entries (each no more than 200 words) and the diversity of their forms (narratives, poems, lists, manifestoes, meditations, and microessays).

Speakers
VA

Vidhu Aggarwal

Rollins College
Vidhu Aggarwal’s poems appeared in the top 2016 poems in The Boston Review, and recently in The Black Warrior Review, The Chicago Quarterly Review, and The Orlando Museum of Art’s “Baggage Claims” exhibition. A chapbook about gaming worlds and A.I., Avatara, is coming out... Read More →
KA

Kimberly Alidio

Kimberly Alidio wrote After projects the resound (Black Radish, 2016). She received a doctorate from the University of Michigan, held and left a tenure-track position at the University of Texas’ History Department/ Center for Asian American Studies, and currently studies poetry... Read More →
CC

cris cheek

cris cheek is a transatlantic documentary performance writer, sound composer and photographer. He worked alongside Bob Cobbing and Bill Griffiths with the Consortium of London Presses in the mid 1970s to run a thriving open access print shop for indie poets. In 1981 he co-founded... Read More →
avatar for Shanna Compton

Shanna Compton

Shanna Compton is the author of Brink (Bloof, 2013), For Girls & Others (Bloof, 2008), Down Spooky (Open Book Award Winner, Winnow, 2005), and several chapbooks. Current projects include The Hazard Cycle, a book-length speculative poem, and Creature Sounds Fade, a poetry collection... Read More →
JD

Jill Darling

Jill Darling has an MFA in creative writing and a Ph.D. in twentieth century literature and cultural studies, and is the author of (re)iteration(s) (Spuyten Duyvil), a geography of syntax (Lavender Ink), Solve For (BlazeVOX, ebooks), and begin with may: a series of moments (Finishing... Read More →
AC

Aja Couchois Duncan

Aja Couchois Duncan is a Bay Area educator, writer and coach of Ojibwe, French and Scottish descent. Her writing has been anthologized in Biting the Error: Writers Explore Narrative (Coach House Press,) Bay Poetics (Faux Press) and Love Shook My Heart 2 (Alyson Press). Her debut collection... Read More →
SF

Suzi F. Garcia

Suzi F. Garcia is Noemi Press' Poetry Editor, and is is a poet in the MFA Program at the University of Notre Dame, where she writes about feelings and feminism. Her work can be found in the Yalobusha Review, the Pinch Journal, NAP LOG II, Word Riot, and more. You can find her at... Read More →
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Brenda Iijima

Brenda Iijima’s involvements occur at the intersections and mutations of poetry, research movement, animal studies, ecological sociology and submerged histories. She is the author of seven full-length collections of poetry and numerous chapbooks and artist’s books. Her most recent... Read More →
DT

Dana Teen Lomax

Dana Teen Lomax is a poet, filmmaker, and educator. Her recent project THE BEAUTIFUL is forthcoming from Black Radish Books; together with Jennifer Firestone, she edited Letters to Poets: Conversations About Poetics, Politics, and Community (Saturnalia) which Cornel West called a... Read More →
LR

Linda Russo

Linda Russo is the author of several books of poetry, including Participant (Lost Roads Press), and To Think of her Writing Awash in Light (Subito Press), a collection of lyrical essays. Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing Within the Anthropocene, a collaborative glossary... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
102 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Experimental Spaces: The Role of the Small Press in the Age of Distraction
In a time when our collective intellectual activity is defined—and perhaps degraded—by passive conformity, short attention spans and technology-delivered diversions, how do publishers and writers find a place and an audience? Since its inception in 2015, KERNPUNKT Press has addressed this conundrum by championing innovative and challenging fiction that experiments with language, form, narrative, and structure, and, in particular, by finding writers whose work acknowledges and celebrates its non-conformity in this apparently disinterested ecosystem. Founder and editor Jesi Buell will begin with a reflection on the creation of a new small press in our current cultural climate, and panelists will read samples of their work and discuss their roles as writers of experimental or non-conforming fiction in a time when literature is dismissed as an archaic art form.

Moderators
avatar for Jesi Buell

Jesi Buell

Founder/Publisher, KERNPUNKT Press

Speakers
JD

Jl Daniels

JI Daniels has an MFA in fiction from the University of Houston, and is currently a PhD student at the University of Utah, where he was senior fiction editor, and is currently book editor for Quarterly West. His stories have appeared in Juked, Lunch Ticket, and Southwest Review, among... Read More →
DG

Dana Green

Dana Green lives in Colorado with her husband, where she teaches English and Creative Writing at the Early College of Arvada. She received her PhD from the University of Denver, and MFA from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Dana’s collection of short stories, Sometimes... Read More →
PP

Patrick Parks

Patrick Parks has had fiction published in a variety of journals, including The Chattahoochee Review, The Beloit Fiction Journal, Clockwatch Review, Farmer’s Market, and B City. In addition, he was editor of Black Dirt, a literary journal, edited Sarajevo: An Anthology for Bosnian... Read More →
EQ

Elizeya Quate

Elizeya Quate is a writer & performer usually in San Francisco. Quate’s first book The Face of Our Town (KERNPUNKT Press, 2016) is a fun series of interconnected stories about the serious fun of interconnectedness. Quiet Lightning, Big Lucks, Joyland, Sleepingfish, Tahoma Literary... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
118 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Innovating Visions of the End and After
Amitav Ghosh's 2016 The Great Derangement arrives as a timely indictment of so-called serious contemporary fiction (specifically in the Realist mode) for its silence on our global climate catastrophe and for actively concealing the cultural mechanisms that shape and sustain our slide toward extinction. On the potentials of innovative writing, however, Ghosh positions himself somewhat ambivalently. He sidelines sci-fi and cli-fi for engaging in the traits of genre, foregrounding the improbable in their visions of post-apocalyptic futures or the spectacularized moment of collapse. He dismisses modes of the irreal (focusing narrowly on Surrealism and Magical Realism) for trivializing as allegory or imaginative invention the definitively real, if seemingly improbable, evidence of climate change. Yet, in a subsequent passage, Ghosh speculates on the potentials of televisual images, the Internet, and transmedia to represent and to consider how life on Earth may respond to its own end and what may come after. Contra Ghosh's premise about the inherent primacy of Realism's seriousness, this panel is interested in how performances of innovative writing, across media, have been making, and will continue to make, visible the complex networks of political, social, cultural, and environmental action and inaction that have shaped the downward spiral of the Anthropocene. Indeed, given innovative writing's inherent resistance to dominant narratives and paradigms, in its multiplicitous approaches to representation, narrative, character, and materials, it may be the mode best suited to addressing the linkages between the micro- and macroscopic, the personal and more than human, emergencies of our time.

Speakers
GH

Gretchen Henderson

Gretchen Henderson writes across genres, disciplines, and geographies to cross-pollinate creative and critical practices. She is the author of four books of nonfiction and fiction, as well as poetry chapbooks, opera librettos, and artistic media works. Her latest book on Ugliness... Read More →
NH

Noy Holland

Noy Holland is the recipient of the 2018 Katherine Anne Porter Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Her latest book, I Was Trying to Describe What It Feels Like, New and Selected Stories, was published by Counterpoint in January 2017. Her novel, Bird (Counterpoint... Read More →
avatar for Michael Mejia

Michael Mejia

Associate Professor, University of Utah
Author of the novels TOKYO and Forgetfulness, Editor-in-Chief @ Western Humanities Review, Co-founding editor @ Ninebark Press, Associate Professor @ U of Utah
MM

Miranda Mellis

Miranda Mellis is the author of Demystifications (forthcoming, Solid Objects). Other books include The Instead, The Spokes, None of This Is Real, and The Revisionist. She is an occasional columnist at The Logger. She co-founded and co-edited The Encyclopedia Project and teaches at... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
129 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Mixed Panel 14
Ian Hatcher, "All Hands Meeting"
"All Hands Meeting" is a solo performance/reading that presents itself as a corporate meeting presided over by a synthetic manager. Three new strategic initiatives are presented to the audience of interns; the nature of the future of the organization's work is discussed; a poem on space colonization as escapist fantasy is read; and a serious but highly flawed argument is made for turning over all substantial and complex policy decisions to software.

Richard Holeton, "Found Poetry as Multimedia Slideshow"
“Afterword(s): Take a Book/Leave a Book” is a found poetry experiment in which I constructed a series of poems from the final words of books being tossed out or recycled. The text version is forthcoming in the journal Forklift, Ohio, Issue #37. I’ll present a multimedia/slideshow version of the work, highlighting the methodology of using a Take a Book/Leave a Book library as source material for appropriated text.


Speakers
IH

Ian Hatcher

Ian Hatcher is a writer, vocalist, performer, and programmer whose work explores cognition in the context of digital systems. He has performed at Artists Space, e-flux, The Kitchen, Fondation Louis Vuitton, the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the Alexandrinsky Theater in St. Petersburg... Read More →
avatar for Richard Holeton

Richard Holeton

Assistant Vice Provost for Learning Environments (Emeritus), Stanford University
Writer and educational consultant Richard Holeton is Assistant Vice Provost for Learning Environments, Emeritus, at Stanford, where he also formerly taught writing for 12 years, helping pioneer digital and networked pedagogies and the design of technology-rich learning spaces. He... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
117 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Mixed Panel 3
Clark Lunberry, "Surface Tension | Writing on Water and Air"
The surfaces upon which we write are often taken for granted, assumed to be sturdy enough to sustain the words upon which they are written. With ink absorbing onto paper, our typed-out letters “saved” upon the computer, we write with the assurance of endurance, with the confidence that when we return to the page, or awaken our sleeping screens, the words will still be there, as if awaiting our eager eyes, as if still living in their visible inscriptions. Though not as sturdy as carving into stone, printing onto paper nonetheless promises a durability that can still easily be mistaken for the nearly eternal, offering the illusion of permanence.
 
With writing on water and writing on air, however, no such promises can be made, no such illusions entertained. For the surfaces of substances—unlike paper, stone, or screen—are such that a word either floats or sinks, tenuously placed at the mercy of the setting, that temporary site of the writing.
In my &Now 2018 presentation, I will speak about such surface tensions in the writing of a poem and the vulnerabilities arising from a writing on water and air. Following Blanchot’s conviction that “the word is itself no longer anything but the appearance of what has disappeared,” I will speak about my own poetry installations at sites around the world, my own explorations of surface and substance in the writing of a poem through which, as Blanchot describes, “the words…draw light from their dimming, clarity from the dark.”

Davis Schneiderman and Joshua Corey,  "The Whole World is Watching: 1968 Chicago, Today"
2018 falls six decades after the start of the 1968 US Presidential campaign that eventually led to the reelection of Richard Nixon. In the intervening months between fall 1967 and the November 1968 election, Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy would be assassinated and America would continue experiencing a series of unprecedented cultural changes; anti-war protests would coalesce around the events of the Chicago 1968 Democratic Convention in August 1968—an (dis)alignment of New Left protestors, Yippies, the National Guard, and an aging Mayor Richard J. Daley (already losing his hold upon the Democratic machine)—covered, for Esquire Magazine, by Terry Southern, William S. Burroughs, and Jean Genet. The events culminated in “The Battle of Michigan Avenue” on August 28, 1968 where National Guard troops beat protestors at the corner of Balbo and Michigan, outside the convention hotel, the Conrad Hilton. These images, seen by millions and accompanied by disarray on the convention floor, effectively torpedoed the candidacy of “compromise” Democratic party nominee Hubert Humphrey. This amazing moment of a supremely Chicago political riot, interlaced by writers and artists whose dislocations contributed to the general magnetic forces powering the extraordinary events, is also a surprisingly “Beat” moment. The nexus is coordinated not only by the involvement of Burroughs (and Allen Ginsberg) and Genet, via Esquire, but by the tactics of the Yippies to destabilize the military-industrial complex and the hegemonic political institutions of the period. The values espoused by Abbie Hoffman and co. are highly conversant with Burroughs’ texts such as “Electronic Revolution,” and the events of 1968 clearly marked texts such as The Wild Boys, etc. Accordingly, the Muttering Sickness—a collective of American authors, actors, musicians, and academics—proposes a site-specific response to Chicago 1968 and its larger connection to the Beat legacy. Following performances at the European Beat Studies Association conference in Paris and the Wounded Galaxies Festival at Indiana University, the Muttering Sickness proposes an iteration of thi live reading/sound/image performance that will explore the thematic of Chicago 1968 through an intertextual exploration of Burroughs’ and Genet’s Esquire contributions, footage of the 1968 events, sound collage, and audience participation.

Danielle Vogel, "Archivist of Air: The Earth Archives"
Elements are often considered in their physical forms, rooted within a particular place and time. In Danielle Vogel’s life-long archival project, The Earth Archives, water, earth, air and fire are invisible and set loose in the air as sound, but are, perhaps, no less tangible. An installation composed entirely of voices, The Earth Archives brings together the recorded memories of hundreds of people creating what the artist calls a living, aural archive. Illuminating Vogel’s interest in the art of archiving and the conductive power of language, this archive animates the elements through the acts of languaging, bringing geographies and times into and out of tactility as the voices travel and accumulate. For this panel, Danielle Vogel will play selections from the archive, present a lyric talk about the project and its future, as well as record the voices of those present to add to the ever-growing collection of memories stored in the archive.

Speakers
CL

Clark Lunberry

University of North Florida
Clark Lunberry is a Professor of English at the University of North Florida, in Jacksonville, Florida (USA). He is the author of Writing on Water / Writing on Air (2016) and Sites of Performance—Of Time and Memory (2014). His interdisciplinary scholarship has been published in such... Read More →
DS

Davis Schneiderman

Lake Forest College
Davis Schneiderman’s works include the DEAD/BOOKS trilogy (Jaded Ibis), including the blank novel BLANK, the plagiarized novel [SIC] (Fall 2013), and the ink-smeared novel INK. (2016); and the novel Drain (Northwestern 2010). He co-edited the collections Retaking the Universe: Williams... Read More →
DV

Danielle Vogel

Wesleyan University
Danielle Vogel is a writer, interdisciplinary artist and ceremonialist. She is the author of Between Grammars, the artist book Narrative & Nest, the e-chapbook In Resonance, and the forthcoming poetry collections The Way a Line Hallucinates its Own Linearity and Edges & Fray. As a... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
119 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Queer Enough: Radical Representations of Maternity and Desire
Many contemporary writers have been queering maternity for years now. Sarah Vap’s poetry collections Faulkner’s Rosary and Viability, Ariana Reines’ The Cow, Catherine Wagner’s Macular Hole, and Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts, are just a few of the texts that seek to deconstruct and destabilize heteronormative notions of motherhood, capitalist biopower, agency, physical and emotional labor, otherness and difference. These women have chosen writing as a means to convey an experience of the maternal that is both generative and metaphoric as well as autobiographical and literal, and it is the metaphorical sense that this paper investigates most closely, looking at how language itself is destabilized, and transformed, in practices of queering. “I had spent a lifetime devoted to Wittgenstein’s idea that the inexpressible is contained — inexpressibly! — in the expressed . . . Its paradox is, quite literally, why I write, or how I feel able to keep writing,” as Nelson says. When we learn to practice defining, examining, and (when appropriate) shedding our assumptions, we discover new freedom and flexibility. Queering, as an act of ongoing transformation—much like metaphoric thinking—is one way to do that. Thinking of queer as a verb is liberating because it becomes something we can choose to do, in much the same way that bell hooks suggests making love an action and a choice, rather than only thinking of it as a noun. Each time we discover a new word or identity or category, we can queer it. And when we create new words or identities, we can queer them. It’s a practice, rather than a goal or finished product.

Speakers
VK

Virginia Konchan

Author of a poetry collection, The End of Spectacle (Carnegie Mellon, 2018), a collection of short stories, Anatomical Gift (Noctuary Press, 2017), and two chapbooks, including That Tree is Mine (dancing girl press, 2018), Virginia Konchan's poetry has appeared in The New Yorker... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Pafunda

Danielle Pafunda

Assistant Professor of English, University of Maine
Danielle Pafunda is author of nine books including the recent Beshrew (Dusie Press) and The Dead Girls Speak in Unison (Bloof Books), and the forthcoming The Book of Scab (Ricochet Editions) and Spite (Ahsahta Press 2020, Sawtooth finalist). She has taught at the University of Wyoming... Read More →
MR

Mg Roberts

Kelsey Street Press
Mg Roberts is a multimedia artist, poet, and teacher. She is the author of the poetry collections Anemal Uter Meck (Black Radish Books, 2017) and not so, sea (Durga Press, 2014). Her work has appeared in Dusie, Bombay Gin, Web Conjunctions, Elderly and elsewhere. Currently she is... Read More →
SV

Sarah Vap

Sarah Vap is the author of six books of poetry and poetics, including her most recent End of the Sentimental Journey (Noemi Press, 2013) and Viability (Penguin, 2016). Her seventh book, Winter, is forthcoming from Noemi Press in 2018. She is Core Faculty at the Drew University MFA... Read More →
CW

Catherine Wagner

Professor of English and director of the Creative Writing Program, Miami University
Catherine Wagner is author of Nervous Device (City Lights, 2012), My New Job (Fence, 2009), Macular Hole (Fence, 2005), and Miss America (Fence, 2001). Her work has been anthologized in the Norton Anthology of Postmodern American Poetry, Out of Everywhere: Linguistically Innovative... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
136 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Crypto-Poiesis: Reimagining the Real through the Non-Human
This panel will address ways in which occult, imaginative, and non-human methods of poiesis can de-center, interrogate, and re-compose what is traditionally thought of as the "real," in some of its complex permutations. Our papers will explore ways in which nature and the non-human provide powerful models by which we can come to new understandings of non-human creative processes and the formation of a non-human ontology. The term "nature" is fraught with complexities, and no longer signifies a space apart from human activity and intervention. But, without reverting to a naive or Romantic understanding of the natural world, our presentations will invoke nature as a location which de-prioritizes the human subject or a location in which human and non-human can blur and conjoin. Or, perhaps we will find that non-human methods of poiesis and poetic inquiry into the real close themselves off from the human subject and can only be peered into from a distance. In the case of so-called occult poets, the magical aspiration to actually invoke the supernatural through poiesis demonstrates another way that writers have attempted to escape subjectivity. The presentations will blend creative work and critical writing as a means of endeavoring to both define and exemplify (or at least to point towards) a way to use cryptic and non-human knowledge to articulate the real through objects and poetic forms.

*This panel is a hybrid of critical papers and creative reading*

Speakers
avatar for Claire Cronin

Claire Cronin

PhD student, University of Georgia
Claire Cronin is a poet and songwriter from Los Angeles who currently lives in Athens, GA. She is the author of A Spirit is a Mood Without a Body, winner of the 2018 Dead Lake Chapbook contest. She also won the 2014 Fairy Tale Review Poetry Award, judged by Ilya Kaminsky. Claire's... Read More →
avatar for Paul Cunningham

Paul Cunningham

Paul Cunningham is currently pursuing a PhD in Creative Writing at the University of Georgia. His poems have appeared in Bullets into Bells, Burning House Press Online, OmniVerse, SAND, Yalobusha Review, DIAGRAM, Gigantic Sequins, Bat City Review, and others. He recently completed... Read More →
CF

Connor Fisher

Connor Fisher lives in Athens, Georgia. He has an MA in English Literature from the University of Denver, an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and is working towards a PhD in English and Creative Writing at the University of Georgia. Reviews and poetry... Read More →
JS

Jake Syersak

Jake Syersak received his MFA from the University of Arizona and is currently pursuing a PhD in English and Creative Writing at the University of Georgia. His poems have appeared in Conjunctions, Colorado Review, Black Warrior Review, Omniverse, Notre Dame Review, and elsewhere. He... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
138 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Poetic Resistance Lab
This conversation considers contemporary forms of political resistance through an examination of poetry that deconstructs, misuses, and talks back to state policies and ideologies. We explore the oppositional stances that contemporary poetry takes in its relation to oppressive regimes and discuss our own everyday, poetic, and pedagogical practices of resistance.

In “The Uses of Poetry: Cuba’s Neoliberal Turn,” Candice Amich compares the differing definitions and uses of “poetry” in official versus independent spaces in order to articulate the shifting relationship between politics and aesthetics since the 1959 Cuban Revolution.

Keegan Cook Finberg’s “Poetry of State-Sanctioned Violence” discusses poetry collections published since 2015 that expose how the shared vocabulary and grammars of public state-sanctioned violence are also experienced privately and intimately. These recent collections subvert and eschew usual poetic classifications, expressing political resistance through major tropes of both confessional lyric and the hallmarks of the avant-garde.

In “The Feminist Poetics of Refusal,” Becca Klaver investigates the tactics of two texts that refuse the social conditions of the poetry world as a microcosm of patriarchal culture: the collectively written “No Manifesto” (2015) and Jennif(f)er Tamayo’s book YOU DA ONE (2017). Drawing on theories from queer and black radical traditions, refusal can be understood as a way to actualize alternative worlds and as a mode of care.

In the second half of the session, we will invite the audience to discuss their own forms of resistance in small groups, finally reconvening to share poetic and practical strategies.

Speakers
CA

Candice Amich

Candice Amich is an assistant professor of English at Vanderbilt University. She is co-editor, with Elin Diamond and Denise Varney, of Performance, Feminism and Affect in Neoliberal Times (Palgrave, 2017). Her forthcoming book, Precarious Forms: Performing Utopia in the Neoliberal... Read More →
KC

Keegan Cook Finberg

Assistant Professor of English, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Keegan Cook Finberg will be an assistant professor of English at University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) starting in the fall of 2018. Her current book project, Poetry in General, or, Literary Experimentalism since 1960, argues that postwar U.S. poetry responds to the degradation... Read More →
avatar for Becca Klaver

Becca Klaver

Robert P. Dana Emerging Writer Fellow, Cornell College
Becca Klaver is the author of two books of poetry—LA Liminal (Kore Press) and Empire Wasted (Bloof Books)—and several chapbooks. Her critical writing appears in College Literature, Angels of the Americlypse: New Latin@ Writing, and elsewhere. As an editor, she cofounded Switchback... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
131 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Meekling Talks: &NOW Edition
Meekling Talks is Meekling Press’s fictional lecture series, formed from a desire to work with writers and artists in a way that breaks from the conventions of the reading series. Inspired by Pataphysics and Dada alike, Meekling Talks opens the performative space of a reading to possibility, play, and bafflement. Our Lecturers read/perform/lecture on a subject of their choice, with the only stipulation being the talk must be fictional in some way.

Many Talks adopt the conventions of the performative lecture, using projection and images for narrative enhancement. Others are more physically performative and interactive, such as Anna Wolfe-Pauly's Wind Reading, which demonstrated methods of wind reading through video and sound clips and then asked the audience to engage in forms of wind reading. Past Talks have touched on topics as varied as the meaning of Hair post-Britney (Spears) Crisis, Clairaudience, and the Sexual Practices of Diacritical Marks.

For the occasion of &NOW 2018, we're re-staging variations of our favorite Talks from the past four years. Dao Ngyuen's "Bibliologarrhythmia: discoveries in an ongoing investigation of intra-textuality or secret longings from the library" investigates the connection between the physical and the textual.  Jessica Anne's lecture "On Mothering" takes a multifaceted look at the history of childbirth, ranging from examples of bad mothering (Mommie Dearest) to questioning the cult of the family. Rebecca Nakaba drew from her B-Movie abstracts featured in the Meekling Review to discuss her B-Movie research, addressing questions such as: do swamp habitats alter a monster's genetic makeup, thereby making it even more monstrous?

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Anne

Jessica Anne

Jessica Anne is the author of A Manual For Nothing (Noemi Press), she's also an alumna of The Neo-Futurist ensemble. Anne edits Nonfiction for MAKE Literary Magazine, and serves as an artistic director for MAKE Magazine Productions' biannual Lit & Luz Festival, a celebration of literature... Read More →
RN

Rebecca Nakaba

Rebecca Nakaba is a writer and multimedia artist. She uses the biological and cosmological to show that the boundaries between the body and self, and the natural and supernatural worlds, are thin and flexible. Specimen collections, mythologies, sublime landscapes, and scientific histories... Read More →
DN

Dao Nguyen

Dao Nguyen is a Chicago-based, interdisciplinary artist. She choreographs thought experiments, play apparatuses, obstacle courses, and transformation rituals. A score becomes a map is a situation where objects, actions, and bodies encounter philosophical questions concerning representation... Read More →
AK

Anne K. Yoder

Anne K. Yoder’s work has appeared in Fence, Bomb, and Tin House, among other publications, and is forthcoming in They Said: A Multi-Genre Anthology of Contemporary Collaborative Writing. She is a staff writer for The Millions and a member of Meekling Press, a collective micro-press... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
140 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Braided Voices
Three women writers present their poetry, fiction, and visual language through interlaced readings. In weaving together their individual forms/individual visions, this presentation creates a chorus of language/image/sound that lives beyond its original source. These writers join together to create something new. Language is reordered, meaning reframed. Energy emerges from a collage sensibility. In this collaborative process, blending and folding of genres is inherent. This experiment does not consist of one-discipline scripts but line-by-line-by-logogram-by-phrase-by-word-by-sentence-by-breath constructions stitched together from disparate writings via their originators’ voices.

Speakers
RG

Rebecca Goodman

Rebecca Goodman is the author of The Surface of Motion (Green Integer) and Aftersight (Spuyten Duyvil). She is the co-author of The Assignment (Fountainhead Press). Her writing has appeared in such places as Mantissa, the Denver Quarterly, Western Humanities Review, Madhatters... Read More →
LH

Larkin Higgins

Larkin Higgins is a poet/artist/professor whose poetic and hybrid pieces can be found in Diagram, Eleven Eleven, Yellow Field, Visio-Textual Selectricity (Runaway Spoon Press), The L.A. Telephone Book, Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 and elsewhere. Mindmade Books published Of Traverse and Template... Read More →
SL

Stacey Levine

Stacey Levine has written four books of fiction: The Girl with Brown Fur: Tales and Stories, Frances Johnson (a novel), Dra--- (a novel),  and My Horse and Other Stories. A recipient of a PEN/West Fiction award and a Stranger Genius Award for literature, she has contributed fiction... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
126 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Book Sale
Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 5:00pm EDT
108 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

⟨strike⟩#NEWS⟨/strike⟩: A Pan-Locale Media Score (in Room 200 in Riley Hall)
⟨strike⟩NEWS⟨/strike⟩ is a LIVE broadcast performance engaging with the persistent conflict between authoritative and personal voices. Using the generalized score NEWS, developed by Ryan ⊥ Dunn and Heather McShane, this instance of the score will focus on extreme hierarchy and dissent. Participants re/act in and to nearby scenes with two live video streams, split-screen, alongside a Twitter feed, projected to the audience in Riley Hall. The two videos will be of two reporters roaming the nearby environment, encountering performers/citizens (and, of course, other people), reporting on noteworthy scenes, and capturing all via live-streamed videos. Meanwhile, back in Riley Hall, a singular Twitter user/newscaster’s response to these scenes is foregrounded on another projector along with a polarized base of followers, some other newscasters. In addition to the normative passive engagement, audience is implicitly invited to interact with the reporters by leaving the presentation room or by participating in the developing Twitter feed’s account of the organic scenes. 

 

Speakers
PB

Popahna Brandes

Popahna Brandes is the author of In An I (Sidebrow Books, 2015); Reading Tests, in collaboration with Jack Henrie Fisher (Jan Van Eyck Academie, 2012); and The Sea In Me/The Riddle We Heard (The Corresponding Society, 2011). Works of translation, prose, film and music have been published... Read More →
ND

Nicholas Davis

Nicholas Davis was raised in the Seattle, WA area, where he played music in bands instead of going to college. He moved to Chicago in 2010 where he co-founded a collective of musicians dedicated to improvised music, and was a DJ on NUMBERS.FM. He then received a BFA from SAIC focusing... Read More →
RD

Ryan ⊥ Dunn

Ryan ⊥ Dunn is a media and performance artist considering the implications and manipulation of mediation and communication. He is invested in open culture, expanded field interventions, and the primacy of experience as product. His practice is inherently collaborative, redefining... Read More →
CF

Chelsea Fiddyment

Chelsea Fiddyment is a language artist investigating the relationship between form and content in narrative fiction through text, performance, book objects, installation art, and publication platforms. She is also a classically trained vocalist. Her work has been featured in galleries... Read More →
LF

Laurel Forest Foglia

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Laurel Forest Foglia is a writer, editor, and educator. Currently based in Chicago, she works as a writing tutor and instructor at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Chicago Poetry Center, Instituto del Progreso Latino, Malcolm X College, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago... Read More →
LF

Lindsey French

Lindsey French is an artist and educator whose work engages in gestures of communication with landscapes and the nonhuman. Embracing a number of mediation strategies, her projects materialize as texts written in collaboration with trees, scent transmissions, performative lectures... Read More →
avatar for Heather McShane

Heather McShane

DePaul University
Heather McShane enjoys thinking about language as experience. She wrote No Home but Everywhere, a fictional narrative of unexpected encounters on a walk, and is working on a manuscript that largely moves through her late mother’s house. She teaches at DePaul University, leading... Read More →
avatar for Natasha Mijares

Natasha Mijares

Natasha Mijares is an artist, writer, curator, and educator. She received her MFA in Writing from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited at MECA International Art Fair in Puerto Rico, Sullivan Galleries, TCC Chicago, and Locust Projects. She has been published... Read More →
DN

Dao Nguyen

Dao Nguyen is a Chicago-based, interdisciplinary artist. She choreographs thought experiments, play apparatuses, obstacle courses, and transformation rituals. A score becomes a map is a situation where objects, actions, and bodies encounter philosophical questions concerning representation... Read More →
HT

Hui-min Tsen

Hui-min Tsen's work explores the act of exploration itself with an emphasis on the individual’s everyday relationship with place, wonder, and the unknown. Through a series of projects ranging from boat-building to walking tours, she has sought to cross the distance between here... Read More →
JW

John Wilmes

John Wilmes is a writer and professor in Chicago. He is at work on a book called The Saxophone Thieves.
AK

Anne K. Yoder

Anne K. Yoder’s work has appeared in Fence, Bomb, and Tin House, among other publications, and is forthcoming in They Said: A Multi-Genre Anthology of Contemporary Collaborative Writing. She is a staff writer for The Millions and a member of Meekling Press, a collective micro-press... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:35am - 11:50am EDT
Riley Hall

10:35am EDT

Dark Sonics
In response to unsurvivable times, we four artists will sound a twitchy sonic map of the afterworlds. With song, text, image and noise, we'll send out signals which bounce back to reveal and configure our improbably-shaped yet persisting bodies. We will recognize the occult and/or denied survival strategies of our forebears and enfigure what survival might entail in a damagesphere--what 'after' might mean in a foreversphere stretching forward and backward in time.

Speakers
DK

Douglas Kearney

Douglas Kearney has published six books, most recently, Buck Studies (Fence Books, 2016), winner of the Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Prize, the CLMP Firecracker Award for Poetry, and silver medalist for the California Book Award (Poetry). BOMB says: “[Buck Studies] remaps the... Read More →
MM

Madison McCartha

Madison McCartha holds the MFA from Notre Dame, is in residence at the Millay Colony, and has developed an aesthetic-theoretical model of sound and blackness known as the Freakophone.
JM

Joyelle McSweeney

University of Notre Dame
Joyelle McSweeney is Prof of poetry at Notre Dame.
AR

Andra Rotaru

Andra Rotaru works at the intersection of poetry, fiction, photography, and performance and has won multiple major awards in her native Romania.


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:35am - 12:00pm EDT
136 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

Speculative Bodies: A Confluence of Imagetext
Understanding how writing thinks and acts upon “the world” involves a messy methodological engagement with the body between disciplinary categories. The body becomes a moving target in the margins, and this panel speculates on when or where it (im)positions itself. This panel looks at a series of writings that foregrounds the body. Texts reimagine and transform the body’s corporeal genealogies linked with the environment, economies, politics, place and power. To write about human experience in such genealogies is to give it speculative expression that begins to grapple with the potential and limits of hair/skin/bone/nails. As custodians of radical re-visions of social organization and behavior, writers such as CA Conrad, Margaret Atwood, Nalo Hopkinson, Anne Boyer, Robin Coste Lewis, Tananarive Due, Octavia Butler, Adrian Piper, Sylvia Wynter, Coco Fusco, Lidia Yuknavitch, Samuel Beckett, Elizabeth Grosz, and Kathy Acker engage these relationships. Presenting our own creative-critical work—textual and photographic—, we reflect on black joy, trauma, motherhood, war veteran, disability, and all our shifting statuses, which are articulated by the body in the text and the body as the text. This discussion is interdisciplinary, combining prose, essay, poetics, imagery and stem cell genetics. Here, we approach new social possibilities by opening new conceptualizations of identity through realist contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Dulaney

Kelly Dulaney

Kelly Dulaney began in the cinders of Arizona; now she lives alongside the hogback hills of Colorado. Her writing appears in Western Humanities Review, Cherry Tree, Black Warrior Review, Fugue, Waxwing, Fairy Tale Review, The Best American Experimental Writing Anthology (BAX) 2015... Read More →
avatar for Thaïs Miller

Thaïs Miller

UC Santa Cruz
Thaïs Miller is the author of the novel, Our Machinery (2008), and the collection, The Subconscious Mutiny and Other Stories (2009). At UC Berkeley Extension and the Gotham Writers Workshop, she taught literature and creative writing. In San Francisco, she volunteers as an editorial... Read More →
CA

crystal am nelson

crystal am nelson is an artist, scholar, and independent curator. Currently a PhD candidate in visual studies at UC Santa Cruz, her current work investigates the relationship between the black radical imagination, black desire, and safe space.
CT

Cathy Thomas

University of California, Santa Cruz
Cathy Thomas is a UC President's Dissertation Year Fellow at UC Santa Cruz examining carnivalesque in Caribbean literature with her spec fiction novel Poco Mas. She has worked for NBC, CBS, Warner Bros. and in film development for Forest Whitaker. She is a script reader for Annapurna... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:35am - 12:00pm EDT
140 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

The Domestic and the Documentary: Writing the Familial in Literary & Anthropological Work
What forms do we find to give voice to experiences of inheritance? How do images – and stories – travel between the sites of the domestic and the documentary? How might one rework a definitive, monolithic picture of history through documentary poetics? This panel intends to explore the kinds of temporal and dynamic forms that emerge out of the collision of identity, inheritance, and the relationship between so-called private or family spaces and unconventional practices of documentation, with a particular attention to experimental prose forms. Panelists will present their currently developing creative nonfiction, prose poetry, and ethnographic projects, discussing their processes with one another and the audience. Projects include a lyric, multi- and nonlinear family history of political violence and displacement; an exploration of the journal or daily record for T/GNC people as the site of both fact and surreality; and an anthropological case history that follows, through fragments of memory, the reverberations of a diagnosis through one family. Through this discussion, panelists will explore how images move between the sites of the domestic and the documentary; how stories migrate through time, space, bodies, and dreams; and how one might complicate linear genealogies through poiesis, following the temporalities and rhythms of relatedness. Finally, panelists will consider how the 'document' of various forms may sway or change as pressure is put up against its language.

Speakers
SB

S. Brook Corfman

S. Brook Corfman is the author of the forthcoming poetry collection Luxury, Blue Lace (chosen by Richard Siken for the Autumn House Rising Writer Prize) and of Meteorites, a letterpress prose chapbook from DoubleCross Press.
TM

Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint

Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint is the author of the lyric novel The End of Peril, the End of Enmity, the End of Strife, A Haven (Noemi Press, 2018) and the forthcoming family history project, Zat Lun, which won the 2018 Graywolf Nonfiction Prize. Her short prose has appeared in the Black Warrior... Read More →
SE

Sara E. Roth

Sarah E. Roth lives and writes in Baltimore, where she is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from University of Notre Dame.


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:35am - 12:00pm EDT
117 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

Mixed Panel 16: WORD IMAGE in the A / AH / D Gallery, 214 Riley Hall (Gallery Open All Day)
To Be held in A/AH/D Gallery, 2nd Floor, Riley Hall.

Lawrence Coates, "Surrealism and the Very Short Story "
A presentation on creative techniques for composing short shorts, microfictions, and other very brief prose forms. For the past fifteen years at Bowling Green State University, I have included exercises from A Book of Surrealist Games by Alastair Brotchie in my graduate course in Techniques in Fiction. These exercises often result in images with startling juxtapositions. As part of the class, I require students to compose a microfiction incorporating a common image that we come up with. This class assignment has led to numerous published works, including my own “Bats,” winner of the Barthelme Prize in Short Prose. In my presentation, I intend to briefly describe the exercise, then lead those present in a surrealist game to create images. I will end by inviting all to compose microfictions that incorporate one or more of those images.

David Hall, "Stuttering Images"

Jason Lahr, "Microfictions: Painting as Lit"
Jason Lahr’s solo exhibition Microfictions features recent paintings on panel. Utilizing brief texts which he writes and images appropriated from popular and subcultural points of reference, the paintings draw from narrative theory, contemporary and postmodern fiction, semiotics, feminism, and film theory to explore the formation and shaping of working class masculine identity through mass culture. The work utilizes a wide range of painting languages and culturally derived visual vocabularies to address the issue of gender, and more broadly the expectations and assumptions that are implicit within a socially configured identity bound by class. The visual language of digital culture–derived from video games, early computer imaging, and .jpg glitches–is combined with traditional painting techniques and references to illustration, print media, and graphic design, to create an intertextual network that addresses the articulation of masculinity manifested in Generation X.

Julia Pello, "Stuttering Images"


Speakers
avatar for Lawrence Coates

Lawrence Coates

Professor of English and Creative Writing, Bowling Green State University
I've published five books, most recently a novella, Camp Olvido, which has been optioned for the movies by the indie production company FilmScience. I've received the Donald Barthelme Prize in Short Prose, the Miami University Press Novella Prize, and a National Endowment for the... Read More →
JL

Jason Lahr

University of Notre Dame
Jason Lahr was born and raised in rural Pennsylvania. He received his M.F.A. in drawing and painting from Penn State University and his B.F.A. in painting from Clarion University. Since 2004, he has been represented by Aron Packer Projects in Chicago, IL. Lahr’s paintings combine... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:35am - 12:00pm EDT
Riley Hall

10:35am EDT

(An) Alternate Notion(s) of Home
Even if traditional, socially-normative notions and representations of home ever truly reflected lived experience, it is clear they no longer can accommodate the social, cultural, and political realities of contemporary American life. In this interdisciplinary, cross-genre panel, five authors, including two translators, interrogate and deconstruct these limited, commercially-driven ideas of what constitutes home through formally experimental narratives, to offer alternative notions of home. As Wittgenstein famously wrote, “the limits of our world are the limits of our language.” If language is a kind of home, then these writers, whose experiences fall outside existing codifications of belonging, are compelled to employ collage and juxtaposition across medium and genre to invent new formal means of expression. Approaches that traverse boundaries between, within, and across genres—allows these authors to address complicated themes such as transnational identity, adoption, loss, gender, and language through an expansion of given forms. These complex narratives often explore cultural, political, and personal realities. Authors draw from research, biography, criticism, art, popular media, and philosophy to create culturally-relevant artworks that challenge received social norms and push the boundaries of language. Presenters discuss how in crafting (an) alternate notion(s) of home, hybrid forms also invite the critique of social categories in our family-centric culture.

Speakers
avatar for Mary-Kim Arnold

Mary-Kim Arnold

Visiting Lecturer, Brown University
Mary-Kim Arnold’s Litany for the Long Moment (Essay Press, 2018), an experimental memoir about her adoption from Korea at the age of two, has been honored by the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association, featured in NPR’s Code Switch 2018 Book Guide, and named by Entropy... Read More →
SD

Shira Dentz

Shira Dentz is the author of five books, including how do I net thee (Salmon Poetry, 2018), the sun a blazing zero (forthcoming), and Sisyphusina (forthcoming), and two chapbooks including FLOUNDERS (Essay Press). Her writing appears widely in venues including Poetry, American Poetry... Read More →
AG

Allison Grimaldi Donahoe

Allison Grimaldi Donahue is a writer and translator whose work has appeared in places like Words Without Borders, Electric Literature, The Brooklyn Rail, Funhouse Magazine and Mousse Magazine. She has been a Bakeless Fellow at the Bread Loaf Translators’ Conference and artist in... Read More →
JG

Johannes Göransson

University of Notre Dame
Johannes Göransson (b. 1973) is the author of eight books, including The Sugar Book, the memoir POETRY AGAINST ALL (forthcoming) and a critical book about translation, Transgressive Circulation (forthcoming). He has translated a number of books, including works by Kim Yideum, Aase... Read More →
avatar for Diana Khoi Nguyen

Diana Khoi Nguyen

Writer in Residence, University of Tennessee at Knoxville
A poet and multimedia artist, Diana Khoi Nguyen’s debut collection, Ghost Of (Omnidawn, 2018), was selected by Terrance Hayes for the Omnidawn Open Contest. In addition to winning the 92Y "Discovery" / Boston Review Poetry Contest, 2019 Kate Tufts Discovery Award and Colorado Book... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:35am - 12:00pm EDT
129 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

Co-Dependencies: Affected Bodies & the Languages of Personhood
“What really exists is not things made but things in the making.” - William James

How are the frames of reference and relationships between and of living being: plants, animal, (including human animals) activated, and how do these activations create new conditions for increased sensitivities among others(ness)? That is, how do bodies and worlds articulate each other, how does a human body allow an animal’s world to affect her, and in turn, how does a human’s world affect an animal’s body? Or, how do we learn to be affected? By disbanding normative and normalizing positionality vis-à-vis bodily and psychic interrelationality with other animal and plant presences, how does personhood expand and gain complexity manifoldly. Exploring how various systems of language, knowledge and sensing create relations between different bodies, this panel will explore notions of personhood, co-dependency, interspecies communication, insurgency, queerness, and polyphony.

Speakers
KA

Kimberly Alidio

Kimberly Alidio wrote After projects the resound (Black Radish, 2016). She received a doctorate from the University of Michigan, held and left a tenure-track position at the University of Texas’ History Department/ Center for Asian American Studies, and currently studies poetry... Read More →
MD

Michelle Detorie

Michelle Detorie is the author of numerous chapbooks including Fur Birds (Insert Press), How Hate Got Hand (eohippus labs), and Bellum Letters (Dusie). She also makes visual poems, poetry objects, time-based poetry, and curates the public art project, The Poetry Booth. Her first full-length... Read More →
BI

Brenda Iijima

Brenda Iijima’s involvements occur at the intersections and mutations of poetry, research movement, animal studies, ecological sociology and submerged histories. She is the author of seven full-length collections of poetry and numerous chapbooks and artist’s books. Her most recent... Read More →
avatar for Janice Lee

Janice Lee

Assistant Professor, Portland State University
Janice Lee is the author of KEROTAKIS (Dog Horn Press, 2010), Daughter (Jaded Ibis, 2011), Damnation (Penny-Ante Editions, 2013), Reconsolidation (Penny-Ante Editions, 2015), and The Sky Isn’t Blue (Civil Coping Mechanisms, 2016). She writes about the filmic long take, slowness... Read More →
SP

Soham Patel

University of Georgia, Athens
Soham Patel is a Kundiman fellow and an assistant editor at Fence and The Georgia Review. Her chapbooks include and nevermind the storm (Portable Press @ Yo-Yo Labs, 2013) New Weather Drafts (Portable Press @ Yo-Yo Labs, 2016), and in airplane and other poems (oxeye, 2018). She is... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:35am - 12:00pm EDT
131 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

Game Narratives/Narrative Games
Recent years have seen the rise of novels, such as Ready, Player, One and The Hike, that pattern themselves on or around games. What motivates this literary turn, and what does a game model do for and/or to the traditional literary text? Where, also, do these game narratives fit into a larger and longer tradition of fictions that conceive of and play their own games, formal and linguistic and otherwise (some examples being modern and postmodern avant-garde and experimental texts).

Speakers
avatar for Trevor Dodge

Trevor Dodge

Professor, Clackamas Community College + Washington State University - Vancouver
Trevor Dodge is a professor of English at Clackamas Community College.
KP

Kelcey Parker Ervick

Kelcey Parker Ervick is a professor of English at Indiana University South Bend.
avatar for Matthew Roberson

Matthew Roberson

CMU
Matthew Roberson is the author of three novels, 1998.6, Impotent , and List, all from FC2. His short fiction has appeared in Fourteen Hills, Fiction International, Clackamas Literary Review, Western Humanities Review, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and others.  Matthew Roberson... Read More →
MY

Mika Yamamoto

Mika Yamamoto is a teacher and writer based in Chicago.


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:35am - 12:00pm EDT
126 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

I Feel Both Ways
We feel ambivalent. About many things—personal, political, cultural—we feel more than one way. Often, these ways seem to contradict each other, or to cancel each other out. Then what’s left is a lazy hum. But the hum persists. And in its persistence, it becomes less lazy. It’s an earworm, it’s a generator. How might ambivalence be cast not as apathy but as engine?

Narrative prose provides an ideal site for investigating ambivalence as active simultaneity, as both/and, because it inherently always feels both ways, as it contends simultaneously with lived, embodied experience and represents that experience in language on the page. Formal and stylistic considerations—around syntax, proximity, layout, structure—can draw out these dualities without diluting or resolving them.

Ambivalence has a political valence as well. The blunt force of fascism comes without nuance. Politically activated ambivalence is not undone by complexity but views its frictions and multiplicities as power-generating. Intersectionality might be an ambivalent consideration of subjectivity; the split subject doubly, triply asserts herself.

Ambivalence figures differently and divergently in the work of the panelists: Jess Arndt’s subjects straining to be and not be in their bodies; Lucy Corin’s destabilizing narrative structures; Aisha Sabatini Sloan’s juxtapositions of potent cultural moments; Lily Hoang’s movement between animal and human, personal history and myth. Sara Jaffe will introduce and moderate. Together, we’ll work toward a collective understanding of ambivalence—on the page and in the now—that is as dynamic and irreducible as the term itself.

Moderators
avatar for Sara Jaffe

Sara Jaffe

Visiting Assistant Professor of Creative Writing, Reed College
Sara Jaffe (moderator) is the author of the novel Dryland (Tin House, 2015). Her short fiction and criticism have appeared in publications including Catapult, Fence, BOMB, NOON, The Offing, and The Los Angeles Review of Books. She co-edited The Art of Touring (Yeti, 2009), an anthology... Read More →

Speakers
LC

Lucy Corin

Lucy Corin is the author of the short story collections One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses (McSweeney’s Books) and The Entire Predicament (Tin House Books) as well as a novel, Everyday Psychokillers: A History for Girls (FC2). Writings have appeared in places like American... Read More →
AS

Aisha Sabatini Sloan

Aisha Sabatini Sloan’s first essay collection, The Fluency of Light: Coming of Age in a Theater of Black and White, was published by the University of Iowa Press in 2013. Her most recent collection, Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit, was chosen by Maggie Nelson as the winner of the... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:35am - 12:00pm EDT
118 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

An FC2 Reading
A reading of flash fictions from FC2 authors of recent years!

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Natalya Fink

Jennifer Natalya Fink

Georgetown University
Jennifer Natalya Fink is the author of five critically acclaimed novels, including the Dana Award-winning The Mikvah Queen and Lambda-finalist and Doctorow-prize winning Bhopal Dance. She is an associate professor at Georgetown University, where she teaches creative writing and co-founded... Read More →
MM

Michael Martone

Michael Martone writes fiction and non-fiction and has many books in print. These include THE BLUE GUIDE TO INDIANA, also presented on NPR, and MICHAEL MARTONE, a widely-praised set of “false autobiographies.” His latest is BROODING, lyrical essays, and he teaches at the University... Read More →
avatar for Michael Mejia

Michael Mejia

Associate Professor, University of Utah
Author of the novels TOKYO and Forgetfulness, Editor-in-Chief @ Western Humanities Review, Co-founding editor @ Ninebark Press, Associate Professor @ U of Utah
VK

Vi Khi Nao

VI KHI NAO was born in Long Khanh, Vietnam. She is the author most recently of Umbilical Hospital and Sheep Machine; the short stories collection, A Brief Alphabet of Torture, which won FC2’s Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize in 2016; the novel, Fish in Exile (Coffee House... Read More →
avatar for Aimee Parkison

Aimee Parkison

Associate Professor of Fiction Writing, Oklahoma State University
Aimee Parkison is the author of Refrigerated Music for a Gleaming Woman, which won the FC2 Catherine Doctorow Innovative Fiction Prize. Parkison teaches in the Creative Writing Program at Oklahoma State University and has published five books of fiction.


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:35am - 12:00pm EDT
102 DeBartolo Hall

1:00pm EDT

Containing Obsession: Experimental Forms, Invasion, and What Consumes Us
Hybridity in written form often results from obsession. In varying containers, the writers on this panel manipulate their obsessions into works rife with image, art and formal experimentation. These obsessions confront the feeling of invasion: of the body, life and death, space and land and animal. These writers engage with the non-literary world and use the strangeness of language to construct narratives varyingly inward and outward-facing. In this panel, the writers will talk about their research processes, the stories of their obsessions and invasions, and will read from their formally unique works. HOUSE OF MCQUEEN delves into the life and work of Alexander McQueen, the gifted and troubled late fashion designer, with a dazzling array of poetic forms, found work, and invented language. NEVER LEAVE THE FOOT OF AN ANIMAL UNSKINNED is a hybrid collection of poetry and endnotes that engages with taxidermy through historical engagement and material culture research. SUNFLOWER STRESS MATRIX explores the cultivation of sunflowers on the moon during the 1969 Apollo program by combining found language of artists and scientists who question the moon’s ability to contain life. THE MACHINE is a fragmented image/text essay that uses images from the author’s pregnancy ultrasounds and research on the history of ultrasound technology to explore his experiences as a transmasculine gestational parent. UNEARTHING I, II, III is a video essay that examines suspended states of life through animals and landscapes that preserve and redistribute organic and inorganic matter.

Speakers
KM

Krys Malcolm Belc

Krys Malcolm Belc's chapbook of micro essays, In Transit, is forthcoming from The Cupboard Pamphlet. His essays have been featured in or are forthcoming in Granta, Brevity, Black Warrior Review, Redivider, and elsewhere, and his work has been supported by the Sustainable Arts Foundation... Read More →
avatar for Natasha Mijares

Natasha Mijares

Natasha Mijares is an artist, writer, curator, and educator. She received her MFA in Writing from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited at MECA International Art Fair in Puerto Rico, Sullivan Galleries, TCC Chicago, and Locust Projects. She has been published... Read More →
RN

Rebecca Nakaba

Rebecca Nakaba is a writer and multimedia artist. She uses the biological and cosmological to show that the boundaries between the body and self, and the natural and supernatural worlds, are thin and flexible. Specimen collections, mythologies, sublime landscapes, and scientific histories... Read More →
avatar for Sara Ryan

Sara Ryan

Graduate Assistant, Texas Tech University
Sara Ryan received her MFA from Northern Michigan University where she was an associate poetry editor for Passages North. Her work has been published in or is forthcoming from Pleiades, DIAGRAM, The Rumpus, Yemassee, Booth, Prairie Schooner, Hunger Mountain and others. She is the... Read More →
avatar for Valerie Wallace

Valerie Wallace

Valerie Wallace’s debut poetry collection House of McQueen (March 2018) was chosen by Vievee Francis for the Four Way Books Intro Prize in Poetry. In their starred review Publishers Weekly said that Wallace created “…a literary seance…serving as a scholar of and medium for... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:00pm - 2:25pm EDT
131 DeBartolo Hall

1:00pm EDT

Form and (Dis)Content: Speculative and Experimental Approaches to Language by Authors of Color
The aim of this panel is to discuss the many ways writers of color approach common literary traditions, genres, and tropes, as well as the idea of a standard(izing) notion of language itself. We plan to highlight the various strategies and rationales authors of color use to break from “standard English,” and also debate if there should be—or even needs to be—better recognition and a reclassification of literary forms that use multilingual and/or varied syntax and grammar. Robert Duncan [famously?] said, “I don’t seek a synthesis, but a melee.” And yet, this panel will be both synthesis and melee, as its participants will discuss their experiences blending literary and genre fiction, poetry with creative or critical prose, as a means by which to speak to, about, and from certain personal/political identities and viewpoints.

Speakers
LD

Laurin DeChae

University of Albany
Laurin DeChae, Ph. D. candidate at the University at Albany. She received her M.F.A. in poetry from the University of New Orleans. Her work appears or is forthcoming in Harpur Palate, Cleaver Magazine, burntdistrict, S/WORD, Rose Red Review, Rust + Moth, Really System and Star*Li... Read More →
KJ

Kenning JP Garcia

Kenning JP Garcia is a diarist and antipoet living in Albany, NY.
RS

Rone Shavers

Rone Shavers is a writer who publishes in multiple genres. His fiction has appeared in various journals known for showcasing experimental and innovative work, including ACM: Another Chicago Magazine, www.identitytheory.com,Longform.org,Nth Word, Pankmagazine, The Operating System... Read More →
ET

Erika T. Wurth

Erika T. Wurth’s publications include a novel, Crazy Horse’s Girlfriend, two collections of poetry and a collection of short stories, Buckskin Cocaine. Her novel You Who Enter Here is forthcoming from SUNY. A writer of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, she teaches creative writing... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:00pm - 2:25pm EDT
120 DeBartolo Hall

1:00pm EDT

From Condensary to Essay: A Reading
Four poets who have entered the lush field of the essay read their prose pieces. Drawn to more expansive expression, the poets need to spell things out, clear things up, take a different kind of responsibility, reach other parts of the polis and other parts of readers’ minds. In the spirit of experimental trials, these essays endeavor to enlist fact and reason while embodying some of poetry’s most potent qualities and/or directly addressing the deeper essence of what Lorine Niedecker termed poetry’s condensary. As in, assay, as say, as sing.

Speakers
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

University of Washington Bothell
Ching-In Chen is author of The Heart's Traffic: a novel in poems (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009), recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017; 2018 Lambda Literary Award Winner for Transgender Poetry); and to make black paper sing (speCt! Books, 2019). Chen is also co-editor of The Revolution... Read More →
JF

Jennifer Firestone

Assistant Professor of Literary Studies, Eugene Lang College
Jennifer Firestone is the author of five books of poetry and four chapbooks including Story (UDP), Ten, (BlazeVOX [books]), Gates & Fields (Belladonna* Collaborative), Swimming Pool (DoubleCross Press), Flashes (Shearsman Books), Holiday (Shearsman Books), Waves (Portable Press at... Read More →
DT

Dana Teen Lomax

Dana Teen Lomax is a poet, filmmaker, and educator. Her recent project THE BEAUTIFUL is forthcoming from Black Radish Books; together with Jennifer Firestone, she edited Letters to Poets: Conversations About Poetics, Politics, and Community (Saturnalia) which Cornel West called a... Read More →
SR

Sarah Rosenthal

Sarah Rosenthal is the author of Lizard (Chax, 2016), Manhatten (Spuyten Duyvil, 2009), and several chapbooks. A collaboration with poet Valerie Witte is forthcoming from The Operating System. Rosenthal edited A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Poets of the Bay... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:00pm - 2:25pm EDT
119 DeBartolo Hall

1:00pm EDT

Interactive Wet Maps
Part performance, part discussion, this panel operates as space to discuss writing as it emerges out of the complex urgencies of this moment--as ephemera, gesticulation, glimpse, and unfinished business. Writers of color whose work draws from oral histories, documentary poetics, digital modalities, and ritual come together to embody and enact conceptual possibilities in relationship to contemporary surveillance culture with responses, drafts, and improvisations. Through interactions with artifacts, objects, and video footage, panelists will discuss works-in-process and aspire to make new work in the real-time collaborative space of the panel.

Speakers
VA

Vidhu Aggarwal

Rollins College
Vidhu Aggarwal’s poems appeared in the top 2016 poems in The Boston Review, and recently in The Black Warrior Review, The Chicago Quarterly Review, and The Orlando Museum of Art’s “Baggage Claims” exhibition. A chapbook about gaming worlds and A.I., Avatara, is coming out... Read More →
JC

Julian C. Chambliss

Professor of English with Joint Appt. in History, Michigan State University
Julian C. Chambliss is Professor of English with a Joint Appointment in History at Michigan State University. In addition, he is a core participant in the MSU College of Arts & Letters’ Critical Diversity in a Digital Age (CDDA) initiative. His research interests focus on the race... Read More →
TM

Tonya M. Foster

Assistant Professor of Writing & Literature, California College of the Arts
Tonya M. Foster is the author of the bilingual chapbook La Grammaire des Os (joca seria 2016), of the collection A Swarm of Bees in High Court (Belladonna* 2015), and coeditor of Third Mind: Creative Writing through Visual Art (Teachers & Writers Collaborative 2002). A poet and scholar... Read More →
MR

Mg Roberts

Kelsey Street Press
Mg Roberts is a multimedia artist, poet, and teacher. She is the author of the poetry collections Anemal Uter Meck (Black Radish Books, 2017) and not so, sea (Durga Press, 2014). Her work has appeared in Dusie, Bombay Gin, Web Conjunctions, Elderly and elsewhere. Currently she is... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:00pm - 2:25pm EDT
138 DeBartolo Hall

1:00pm EDT

Mixed Panel 2
Michael Joyce, "Reading by Michael Joyce from -Remedia: A Picaresque- "
-Remedia: A Picaresque- will be launched in September 2018 by Steerage Press. It has been described as "a [reinvention of] the genre of the picaresque novel in a mode suited to the 21st century. With a light touch and sure sense of prose rhythm, he introduces a leitmotif of randomly appearing doorways, thresholds into and out of the world, to puncture the narrative space of this engaging [novel]." -Johanna Drucker (Please see attachment for more information about the novel.)

Nick Montfort, "Sizecoded Commodore 64 Concrete"
I propose to screen executable concrete poems I have written for the Commodore 64, in BASIC and in 6502 assembly language, in a performance that relates to the framework of DJ and VJ media presentation. These programs will run, producing visuals and sound. I won't deliver a talk or offer banter. I'll show a set of one-line BASIC Programs “after artists,” including “After Barnett Newman,” “After Damien Hirst,” “After François Morellet,” “After Jasper Johns,” and “Zen for Commodore 64,” all part of the Boston exhibit Programs at an Exhibition, along with the new “After Glenn Ligon.” Also, I'll show one-liners “for poets,” including “Answers to ‘Legion’ for Craig Dworkin,” “Islets for J. R. Carpenter,” “MEM for Steven Zultanski,” “OR ABLE for Amaranth Borsuk,” “The Tapeworm Engine for Darren Wershler,” and “Voyelles for Christian Bök.” Finally, I'll run short program I wrote in assembly language, including “PET Codes” and “Running All Night” (128 bytes), “Traumaphore” (64 bytes), and “Chronon” (32 bytes). I do visualizations for music (DJs, chiptune musicians, livecoded music) using a pair of stock Commodore 64s with a monitor and a video switch. I turn these on and write BASIC programs from scratch, coding on one while displaying the output of a just-completed running program on the other. I will use this setup but will load these programs, also offering explanatory titles.

Barrett Watten, “The Poetics of S P L M N T and _The Annotated ‘Plan B’_”
I am in the initial stages of organizing a new publication project, titled _S P L M N T_, which follows the series of publication platforms I have completed over several decades: _This_, This Press, _Poetics Journal_, and _The Grand Piano_. These projects began by focusing on language-centered formal innovation, then on writings in poetics, and finally on multi-authored writing in a hybrid form of serial narrative. S P L M N T will follow this series by developing a platform for discontinuous experiments in hybrid poetic forms that will, in every instance, explore a faultline between binary oppositions, including: poetry/prose; primary text/interpretive framework; generational divides; gender/ethnic binaries; translational and transnational projects. . . . My intention is to publish _The Annotated “Plan B”_ to coincide with the rollout of the publication project overall and also with the &Now conference. The poem was written immediately after the 2016 election and explores a poetics that refuses to “normalize” the results; it draws from my decades-long experience of “coming to terms with the past” in Germany, and uses the key term _Gleichschaltung_ (switching over; conformity) that was employed in March–April 1993. The translational possibilities of the poem explores the latent fascism congealed within the deformed use of language we have been and are subject to. The poem has now been translated into German and French; when preparing the work for French translation I produced a 50-page, stanza-by-stanza gloss of the poem for the translator. . . . For my presentation at &Now, and depending on the appropriate context, I will explain the publishing project of _S P L M N T_, talk about how _The Annotated “Plan B”_ is the kind of project I want to develop, and read from the poem, translations, annotations—whatever there is time for. As it proved impracticable to organize a multi-author session, I am applying as an individual, and will be happy to present in whatever format is appropriate.


Speakers
MJ

Michael Joyce

Michael Joyce is an important critic of electronic literature. Joyce's -afternoon: a story- (1987) was mong the first literary works of hypertext to present itself as serious literature, and experimented with short-story form in novel ways. He published 13 books of fiction and poetry... Read More →
avatar for Nick Montfort

Nick Montfort

MIT & SfPC
Nick Montfort's computer-generated books of poetry include #!, the collaboration 2×6, Autopia, and The Truelist, the first in the new Using Electricity series from Counterpath. Among his more than fifty digital projects are the collaborations The Deletionist, Sea and Spar Between... Read More →
BW

Barrett Watten

Wayne State University
Barrett Watten is Professor of English at Wayne State University and a member of its Academy of Scholars. He is the author of _The Constructivist Moment: From Material Text to Cultural Poetics_ (2004 René Wellek Prize) and _Questions of Poetics: Language Writing and Consequences_... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:00pm - 2:25pm EDT
118 DeBartolo Hall

1:00pm EDT

Mixed Panel 6
Oana Avasilichioaei, "Operator "
Based on my latest book/beyond-the-book project, Eight Track, which examines the various meanings of “track,” OPERATOR explores the subject position(s) of military drone operators engaged in the act of tracking, identifying, and ultimately destroying. This 15-20 minute multimedia performance combines sounds, electronics, voice, texts, and video projections, in an attempt to immerse the audience in the subject position of the operator. Constructed in an ever-tightening spiral of voiced and projected textual material and a range of sonic matter, the performance also includes a video projection from the perspective of drone cameras hovering over landscapes, watchful, monitoring. The work examines the loss of subjecthood and agency, the negation of complexity, deviation, and unpredictability, and the strict hierarchical structure of power. OPERATOR voices and enacts the subject as vantage point, as occurrence; the subject as the eye that brutes the sky; the malleable hand that blots out the living; the subject as perpetual, replaceable; an operator, not an operative, with future blood on the hands. Some of the subjects entering the operator’s cubicle become troubled by their positions, while others treat it as the ultimate video game. Delving into this difference, OPERATOR is hybrid, part text becoming the camera’s eye, part voice becoming movement, part moving image becoming poetic language, part body becoming sonic reverberation.

Daniel Uncapher, "Five Extraordinary Renditions "
"Five Extraordinary Renditions" is a 15-minute A/V presentation+reading consisting of truncated versions of five songs (Schubert's "Symphony No. 5 in b#," Mozart's "Symphony No. 25 in Gm," Shostakovich's "Waltz No. 2," Mozart's "Queen of the Night Aria," and Camille Saint-Saens' "Danse Macabre") paired with montage footage of various moments, both contemporary and historical, including bodycam footage, interview material, and low-quality consolidated video from a variety of sources. Portions of the video will be accompanied by reading/movement with an experimental interest in the American condition, especially in terms of an oppressive space; the mechanisms and methods through which people are simultaneously dehumanized and weaponized.


Speakers
avatar for Oana Avasilichioaei

Oana Avasilichioaei

Oana Avasilichioaei’s practice is concerned with textuality, polylingual poetics, the social and political forces/voices of the polis, and the intermediary spaces between word, sound and image, exploring the transgressions of these terrains through poetry, translation, performance... Read More →
DU

Daniel Uncapher

University of Notre Dame
My name is Daniel Uncapher and I'm the Sparks Fellow at Notre Dame, where I received my MFA. My work has appeared or is forthcoming in Chicago Quarterly Review, Tin House Online, Baltimore Review, Hawai'i Pacific Review, Neon, and others.


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:00pm - 2:25pm EDT
136 DeBartolo Hall

1:00pm EDT

Noemi Press Reading and Garland Weaving
Four poets with recent books out from Noemi Press read, talk, and lead conversation about the making/being of poems. The making/being of books. We're interested in the passing and weaving of paper or small objects, thinking about and making zines, alternative economies of literary production, certain low-tech mid 60's to late 80's black literary production, reading and hearing poems. All is unfinished; and yet, the book, or not the book, or what's not there, or what's after. Join us and we'll fill the room.

Speakers
CE

Carolina Ebeid

University of Denver
Carolina Ebeid is a PhD candidate in the University of Denver's creative writing program, where she serves as Associate Editor of the Denver Quarterly. She has won fellowships from CantoMundo, the Stadler Center for Poetry, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Her first book... Read More →
avatar for Hannah Ensor

Hannah Ensor

Hannah Ensor is a poet living in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where she works in an office. Her first book, Love Dream With Television, is out from Noemi Press as of September 2018. She's interested in mass media events and the collapsing star of discourse around them.
VA

Vanessa Angélica Villarreal

University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Vanessa Angélica Villarreal was born in the Rio Grande Valley borderlands to formerly undocumented Mexican immigrants. She is the author of the collection Beast Meridian (Noemi Press, Akrilica Series, 2017), winner of the John A. Robertson Award for Best First Book of Poetry from... Read More →
CW

Chaun Webster

Chaun Webster is a poet and graphic designer whose work draws from an interest in the sign of graffiti, the layering of collage, simultaneity, & the visuality of text. Webster utilizes these methods in investigating race – specifically the instability of blackness and black subjectivities... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:00pm - 2:25pm EDT
117 DeBartolo Hall

1:00pm EDT

Spuyten Duyvil celebrates 25 years of Transgressive Writing
Spuyten Duyvil Press, in Brooklyn, N.Y., has, for many years, published important books of innovative writing. The press welcomes work from all, and does not discriminate based on country, creed, color, sex organs, sex identity, preferred sex positions, heart's desire, age, eye color, sports agility, handedness, or lunar sign. In the last ten years, in particular, that publishing has exploded. The press is now going full steam full force full schedule full on with new & new kinds of books. The reviews of Spuyten Duyvil books have been stunning. In 2010, the New York Times named Spuyten Duyvil one of the important cultural institutions in the City. The readers are an assembly of a variety of voices, unafraid of genre agnosticism and risk.

Speakers
avatar for Jorge Armenteros

Jorge Armenteros

Jorge Armenteros is the author of "The Book of I" (Jaded Ibis Press, 2014), an International Latino Book Award finalist, "Air" (Spuyten Duyvil Press, 2016), and "The Roar of the River" (Spuyten Duyvil Press, 2017). His author interviews and book reviews have appeared in The Writer’s... Read More →
avatar for Peter Grandbois

Peter Grandbois

Peter Grandbois is the author of eight previous books, the most recent of which is "This House That" (Brighthorse Books, 2017). His poems, stories, and essays have appeared in over one hundred journals. His plays have been performed in St. Louis, Columbus, Los Angeles, and New York... Read More →
avatar for Katie Jean Shinkle

Katie Jean Shinkle

Assistant Professor of English, Central State University
Katie Jean Shinkle is the author of three books, most recently Ruination(Spuyten Duyvil, 2018). Other prose, poetry, and criticisms can be found in Flaunt Magazine, The Georgia Review, Denver Quarterly, The Collagist, New South, Washington Square Review, and elsewhere. She serves... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:00pm - 2:25pm EDT
126 DeBartolo Hall

1:00pm EDT

Panel on new book, "Experimental Literature: A Collection of Statements" edited by Jeffrey R. Di Leo and Warren Motte
Panel on new book, "Experimental Literature: A Collection of Statements" edited by Jeffrey R. Di Leo and Warren Motte. Panelist will be some of the 33 contributors to the volume.

Speakers
JC

Julie Carr

Julie Carr is an associate professor at the University of Colorado. With Tim Roberts, she co-edits Counterpath Press. Objects from a Borrowed Confession is just out from Ahsahta, and Real Life: An Installation is forthcoming from Omnidawn.
JD

Jeffrey DeShell

Jeffrey DeShell is the author of six novels, mostly recent Expectation (2013) and Arthouse (2011), and a critical book, The Peculiarity of Literature: An Allegorical Approach to Poe’s Fiction. He has co-edited two collections of fiction by American women, Chick-Lit I: Postfeminist... Read More →
avatar for Eckhard Gerdes

Eckhard Gerdes

Publisher, JEF Books/Depth Charge Publishing
Novelist Eckhard Gerdes edits and publishes the Journal of Experimental Fiction and JEF Books.
JR

Jeffrey R. Di Leo

Jeffrey R. Di Leo is dean of the School of Arts & Sciences and professor of English and Philosophy at the University of Houston-Victoria. He is editor and publisher of American Book Review, and the founder and editor of symplokē. His recent books include Corporate Humanities in Higher... Read More →
CM

Christina Milletti

Associate Professor of English, University at Buffalo
Christina Milletti's novel Choke Box: a Fem-Noir was the winner of the 2018 Juniper Prize for Fiction (forthcoming 2019). Her fiction and articles have appeared in many journals and anthologies, such as the Iowa Review (forthcoming), Harcourt's Best New American Voices, The Master's... Read More →
avatar for Lance Olsen

Lance Olsen

Professor & Author, University of Utah
Lance Olsen is author of more than 25 books of and about innovative writing, including, most recently, the novel Dreamlives of Debris (Dzanc, 2017). A Guggenheim, Berlin Prize, D.A.A.D. Artist-in-Berlin Residency, N.E.A. Fellowship, and Pushcart Prize recipient, as well as a Fulbright... Read More →
avatar for Steve Tomasula

Steve Tomasula

Steve Tomasula is the author of the novels The Book of Portraiture (FC2); VAS: An Opera in Flatland (University of Chicago Press), the novel of bio-ethics; TOC: A New-Media Novel (FC2/University of Alabama Press); and most recently, IN&OZ (University of Chicago Press). He is also... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:00pm - 2:25pm EDT
140 DeBartolo Hall

1:00pm EDT

Multilingualisms, Sonic Opacities, Textured Ethics
Performance and reading that shares various experiments in non-monolingual writing practices. Sade Murphy works sonically with English and German. Mirene Arsanios writes across several languages, including the Portuguese-based Caribbean creole Papiamentu. LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs works across a range of languages, including extinct languages, mistranslations, and vernaculars. Christian Hawkey explores intersections between Arabic, English, and German, as well as right to left reading practices.

Speakers
MA

Mirene Arsanios

Mirene Arsanios is the author of the short story collection The City Outside the Sentence (2015). Arsanios cofounded the collective 98weeks Research Project in Beirut and is the founding editor of Makhzin, a bilingual English/Arabic magazine for innovative writing.
avatar for LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs

LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs

Poet, Vocalist, Curator, Artistic Director
A writer, vocalist and sound artist, LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs is the author of TwERK (Belladonna, 2013). Her interdisciplinary work has been featured at the Brooklyn Museum, the Poesiefestival in Berlin, Museum of Modern Art, the QOW conference in Slovakia, the International Poetry... Read More →
CH

Christian Hawkey

Christian Hawkey has written two full-length poetry collections , four chapbooks, and the cross-genre book Ventrakl (2010), Ugly Duckling Presse, about translating Georg Trakl. He is a member of the decolonial translation collective WeTransist (wetransist.org).
SL

Sade LaNay

Sade LaNay (fka Murphy) is a poet and artist from Houston, TX. Sade is the author of Härte (Downstate Legacies, 2018) Dream Machine (co-im-press, 2014) self portrait (birds of lace, 2018) and I love you and I'm not dead (Argos Books, 2019). ​


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:00pm - 2:25pm EDT
129 DeBartolo Hall

1:00pm EDT

FROM OUR HEARTS TO YOURS: NEW NARRATIVE AS CONTEMPORARY PRACTICE
From Our Hearts to Yours: New Narrative as Contemporary Practice (On Contemporary Practice, 2017) is the first comprehensive anthology of essays regarding New Narrative writing and community practices by a younger generation of practitioners and scholars. As co-editors Rob Halpern and Robin Tremblay-McGaw write in their introduction, “We are not interested in offering an ‘authoritative’ canon of New Narrative work, nor are we interested in consolidating an official version of New Narrative’s history. Rather, we want to use this as an opportunity to foreground New Narrative as a movement that is still coming into focus, a more or less unstable object that doesn’t want to be ‘fixed,’ codified, or hardened into a limited & limiting list of names and works. In other words, while we remain committed to a set of past works that have been identified as ‘New Narrative,’ we are equally committed to maintaining New Narrative as a dynamic and ongoing project, one with consequences for our present writing.” Roomy in the collective vision that they manifest, the twenty-four contributions to From Our Hearts to Yours address the AIDS crisis, the politics of race, the structural impacts of neo-liberalism on urban space, and the movement across queer, straight and transgender subject positions.

This roundtable presentation and discussion proposes to take up these topics through short presentations and discussion, while asking Why New Narrative now? And, What are the stakes of New Narrative for our contemporary moment?

This event will include five of the book's contributing writers, plus the its two editors.

Speakers
AK

Amanda K. Davidson

Amanda K. Davidson is the author of the chapbooks Arcanagrams: A Reckoning (Little Red Leaves, 2014), The Space (Belladonna, 2014) and Apprenticeship (New Herring Press, 2013), as well as The Conditions of Our Togetherness, a serial comic on Weird Sister magazine. A 2014 NYFA Fellow... Read More →
TD

Thom Donovan

Thom Donovan is the author of numerous books including The Hole (Displaced Press, 2012), Withdrawn: a Discourse (Shifter, 2016), and Withdrawn (Compline, 2017). He co-edits and publishes ON Contemporary Practice. He is also the editor of Occupy Poetics (Essay Press, 2015); To Look... Read More →
RH

Rob Halpern

Rob Halpern lives between San Francisco and Ypsilanti, Michigan, where he teaches at Eastern Michigan University and Huron Valley Women’s Prison. His books include Common Place (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2015), Music for Porn (Nightboat Books, 2012), Disaster Suites (Palm Press, 2009... Read More →
AJ

Arnold J. Kemp

Arnold J. Kemp is a poet and artist who has collaborated with several New Narrative authors. He was organizing a residency for Kathy Acker at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco before Acker became too ill to follow-through on the project. Alternately, Kemp engaged Dennis... Read More →
MM

Miranda Mellis

Miranda Mellis is the author of Demystifications (forthcoming, Solid Objects). Other books include The Instead, The Spokes, None of This Is Real, and The Revisionist. She is an occasional columnist at The Logger. She co-founded and co-edited The Encyclopedia Project and teaches at... Read More →
RT

Robin Tremblay-McGraw

Robin Tremblay-McGaw lives in San Francisco, writes about poetry and poetics, and teaches in the English Department of Santa Clara University and at Bard College as part of the Institute for Writing and in the Language & Thinking Program. Robin is the author of Dear Reader (Ithuriel’s... Read More →
CW

Catherine Wagner

Professor of English and director of the Creative Writing Program, Miami University
Catherine Wagner is author of Nervous Device (City Lights, 2012), My New Job (Fence, 2009), Macular Hole (Fence, 2005), and Miss America (Fence, 2001). Her work has been anthologized in the Norton Anthology of Postmodern American Poetry, Out of Everywhere: Linguistically Innovative... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:00pm - 2:25pm EDT
102 DeBartolo Hall

2:35pm EDT

Mixed Panel 12
Brent Cox, "Visualizing the Depths in Susan Howe's Debths: A Video Essay "
The event I propose is a screening of a short work (15-20 min) of Animated Video Poetry Criticism focusing on Susan Howe’s recent book, Debths (New Directions, 2017). The video is both a critical investigation of Debths and a co-creative Video Poem/Video Essay in its own right. Susan Howe has been written about extensively, with close attention often given to the visuality of her innovative poetic practice. The intervention my video proposes is that Howe’s sleight of hand (as described by Chelsea Jennings in “Susan Howe’s Facsimile Aesthetic”) multi-modal prose, poetry, and visual aesthetic, by way of its disruption of traditional hermeneutic strategies, calls for the interpretive novelty of another fast-growing genre: the video essay. Creatively animating and blending Howe’s collages with its source material (the work of Paul Thek, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Yeats’s late drafts) my video offers original readings of Howe’s book, while simultaneously providing a critical interpretation. In Debths, language resembles the complex morphology of flickering light playing over the crests and troughs of waves as it reflects and echoes in tentacular networks and nets (to use Donna Haraway’s language). Debths imagines language as a complex social and aesthetic field, suggesting a poetic identity in excess of conventional scales of time and space, reader and writer, poem and material. It generously elicits a form of complex, constellative thinking suited for our difficult times, entangling us in unraveling strings of meaning, while simultaneously gathering us into the immanent field of social relation. In Fred Moten's words, Debths "consents not to be a single being."

Frank Rogaczewski, "I'd Like to Read Some Prose Poems: Is This a Bad Time? "
I’d read a selection of prose poems, including one or two from my first book, The Fate of Humanity in Verse, one or two from my upcoming second book (maybe hopefully our by the fall), and one or two I’m working on for the &NOW 2018 Festival. Contrary to Robert Bly’s notion that the prose “quiets” the poem, this prose noiseys things up, combining personal and political, nonfiction and fiction, Ovidian transmogrifications and smart-ass proletarian poetical tropes, “I do this, I do that” with “been there, done that,” the poetics of fight or flight and the poetics of “We Shall Overcome.”

Julie Carr's "Real Life: An Installation" is a mixed-media show that challenges our concept of the art installation and performance. The event features video and audio by forty artists from diverse backgrounds, stages in their careers, and artistic practices. Each artist has responded to a hypothetical installation written by Julie Carr. Julie Carr can read the accompanying hypothetical installation text while the video is projected. Please see www.realifeaninstallation.com The website is unfinished, but will be finished by October 1.

Speakers
JC

Julie Carr

Julie Carr is an associate professor at the University of Colorado. With Tim Roberts, she co-edits Counterpath Press. Objects from a Borrowed Confession is just out from Ahsahta, and Real Life: An Installation is forthcoming from Omnidawn.
BC

Brent Cox

University at Buffalo
Brent Cox is a poet, video artist, and writer. He is a second-year PhD student in the Poetics Program at University of Buffalo. His work focuses on theorizing poetry and art that resist and expand media and/or generic conventions. He received his M.F.A. from the University of Washington... Read More →
FR

Frank Rogaczewski

Roosevelt University
Frank Rogaczewski is married to Beverly Stewart. They live in Berwyn, IL, with Seamus (their dog) and Gertrude and Virginia (their literary cats). Frank has published one book of prose poems, The Fate of Humanity in Verse, and is expecting another in the fall, 2018. He teaches as... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:35pm - 3:50pm EDT
118 DeBartolo Hall

2:35pm EDT

Philosophy and experimental writing: a reading and conversation
For the most part, English language experimentalism has eschewed the conventions and concerns of philosophical discourse, and Anglo-American philosophical writing has equally avoided the kind of literary and lyric innovations that motivate various poetic and diegetic avant-gardisms. This is not true of other philosophical traditions, and in recent years a number of experimentalists with interests and backgrounds in academic philosophy have begun to incorporate overtly philosophical tropes in their work, writing in prose, verse, and hybrid forms. This panel gathers a number of such writers for a reading of their work and a conversation about the way that philosophical discourse has played a role in their own development as writers both inside and outside of academic philosophy. Participants include Steven Seidenberg, Lou Pam Dick, and Oana Avasilichioaei.

Speakers
avatar for Oana Avasilichioaei

Oana Avasilichioaei

Oana Avasilichioaei’s practice is concerned with textuality, polylingual poetics, the social and political forces/voices of the polis, and the intermediary spaces between word, sound and image, exploring the transgressions of these terrains through poetry, translation, performance... Read More →
LP

Lou Pam Dick

Lou Pam Dick (aka Moina Pam Dick, Mina Pam Dick et al.) plays fast and tense with abstraction, the transtextual, the prose-poetic splinter and the paragraph. Her work explores spiritual contemplation and urban expressionism through forms of the influx and the coil. She is the author... Read More →
AM

Anna Moschovakis

Anna Moschovakis is the author most recently of the novel Eleanor, or, The Rejection of the Progress of Love (Coffee House Press 2018).Her books of poetry include the James Laughlin award-winning You and Three Others Are Approaching a Lake and They and We Will Get Into Trouble... Read More →
SS

Steven Seidenberg

Writer and artist Steven Seidenberg's work is concerned and infused with the algorithmic paradigms and lyrical latencies of Western philosophy and theology, occupying the interstices between philosophical, diegetic, and poetic discursive timbres, while surrendering the epistemology... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:35pm - 3:50pm EDT
136 DeBartolo Hall

2:35pm EDT

Second Person Permeable: Queer Epistolary Poetry
In queer epistolary poetry, how do the boundaries between private desire and social experience begin to unravel? What does it mean for poets to project the body, its desires, and its grievances across the gaps between the the living and the dead, the human and the non-human? Panelists will read and discuss their own experiments with the epistolary form, which address such issues as the potential for intimacy with strangers, the relationship between sex, power, and political solidarity, the ongoing impact of colonialism on the mestizx body, spellwork and conversing with the dead, the queerness of space travel, and the ways that machines embody emotion and gender.

Speakers
avatar for Brent Armendinger

Brent Armendinger

Associate Professor of English and World Literature, Pitzer College
Brent Armendinger is the author of The Ghost in Us Was Multiplying (Noemi Press, 2015), a finalist for the California Book Award in Poetry and Street Gloss, a book of experimental translations forthcoming from The Operating System in 2019. He also has two chapbooks, Undetectable (Diagram/New... Read More →
avatar for Oliver Baez Bendorf

Oliver Baez Bendorf

Assistant Professor of Creative Writing, Kalamazoo College
Oliver Baez Bendorf is the author of Advantages of Being Evergreen (forthcoming 2019), winner of Cleveland State University Poetry Center's 2018 Open Book Poetry Competition, and The Spectral Wilderness (Kent State U., 2015). His poems were anthologized in Troubling the Line... Read More →
JR

Jessica Rae Bergamino

Jessica Rae Bergamino is the author of UNMANNED, winner of Noemi Press' 2017 Poetry Prize, as well as the chapbooks The Desiring Object (Sundress Publications, 2016), The Mermaid Singing (dancing girl press, 2015), and Blue in All Things: a Ghost Story (dancing girl press, 2015... Read More →
AD

Angel Dominguez

Angel Dominguez is a Latinx poet and performance artist of Yucatec Mayan descent, born in Hollywood, and raised in Van Nuys, CA by his immigrant family. He’s the author of Desgraciado (EconoTextualObjects, 2017) and Black Lavender Milk (Timeless, Infinite Light, 2015). His work... Read More →
MR

Margaret Rhee

Margaret Rhee is the author of chapbooks Yellow (Tinfish Press, 2011), Radio Heart; or, How Robots Fall Out of Love (Finishing Line Press, 2015), nominated for a 2017 Elgin Award, SFPA (Science Fiction Poetry Association), and her full length collection Love, Robot (The Operating... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:35pm - 3:50pm EDT
102 DeBartolo Hall

2:35pm EDT

#MeToo as Literary Form
“#MeToo as Literary Form” will feature performances, readings, presentations—in poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and all manner of hybrids—that address the concerns of and cultural moment of #MeToo. Coming from a variety of generations, generic, sexual, and cultural/ethnic backgrounds, the writers on this panel will offer range of attitudes and approaches, offering complications, co-extensions, cooptations—some of the problematics and possibilities—of #MeToo as well as foregrounding the ways in which the movement has touched the (experimental) literary community. Each writer will present creative work that addresses the movement and engage in a lively, exploratory discussion no predetermined goal.

Speakers
AM

Anna Maria Hong

Anna Maria Hong’s first poetry collection, Age of Glass, won the Cleveland State University Poetry Center’s 2017 First Book Poetry Competition and will be published in April 2018. Her novella, H & G, won the A Room of Her Own Foundation’s inaugural Clarissa Dalloway Prize and... Read More →
CM

Christina Milletti

Associate Professor of English, University at Buffalo
Christina Milletti's novel Choke Box: a Fem-Noir was the winner of the 2018 Juniper Prize for Fiction (forthcoming 2019). Her fiction and articles have appeared in many journals and anthologies, such as the Iowa Review (forthcoming), Harcourt's Best New American Voices, The Master's... Read More →
JM

Jonah Mixon-Webster

Jonah Mixon-Webster is a poet, sound artist, and educator from Flint, MI. He is a Ph.D. candidate in English Studies at Illinois State University, and Ahsahta Press released his book, Stereo(TYPE), winner of the Sawtooth Award, selected by Tyrone Williams, in 2018. He has been awarded... Read More →
TL

Timothy Liu (Liu Ti Mo)

Timothy Liu (Liu Ti Mo) was born in 1965 in San Jose, California to immigrant parents from Mainland China. He is the author of ten books of poems, including Of Thee I Sing, selected by Publishers Weekly as a 2004 Book-of-the-Year; Say Goodnight, a 1998 PEN Open Book Margins Award... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:35pm - 3:50pm EDT
126 DeBartolo Hall

2:35pm EDT

Making a Language We Can Learn: Poetics as Collaborative Praxis
In our creative-critical presentation, we reimagine the temporal and spatial boundaries of the conference panel - extending our poetic making as collaborative praxis before and after the realtime &NOW Notre Dame event. Invoking Paulo Freire’s definition of praxis as “reflection and action directed at the structures to be transformed,” we ask: what becomes possible when we begin our panel before the panel? What new conceptions of sense-making and text-making happen if we bring this work to the actual panel and invite attendees to join a making that will extend beyond our gathering together in a room? How might new considerations of collaboration spark innovative, process-oriented approaches to poetry, narrative and performance? What emergent communities are put into motion in this praxis?

In the spirit of alternative structures that embody constitutive, living energies - rhizomatic, mycorrhizal, vibrational, and prismatic - we seek new ways of making creative work. We begin with a public call for submissions around an initial question: What do we do together? Next, we will curate the texts into a print publication launched at the panel, where we will read and perform from the publication and discuss our process. Simultaneously, we will launch an online version, inviting attendees to live annotate and co-create during and after the panel. In this way, the text moves into new iterations of itself, absorbing &NOW energies, carrying and transmuting them into the ongoing publication. Where will this take us and who will this us be when the panel beyond the panel continues...

Speakers
avatar for Harold Abramowitz

Harold Abramowitz

Charles R. Drew University
Harold Abramowitz’s books include Blind Spot, Not Blessed, Dear Dearly Departed, and Man’s Wars And Wickedness: A Book of Proposed Remedies & Extreme Formulations for Curing Hostility, Rivalry, & Ill-Will (with Amanda Ackerman). Harold co-edits the short-form literary press eohippus... Read More →
avatar for Janice Lee

Janice Lee

Assistant Professor, Portland State University
Janice Lee is the author of KEROTAKIS (Dog Horn Press, 2010), Daughter (Jaded Ibis, 2011), Damnation (Penny-Ante Editions, 2013), Reconsolidation (Penny-Ante Editions, 2015), and The Sky Isn’t Blue (Civil Coping Mechanisms, 2016). She writes about the filmic long take, slowness... Read More →
AQ

Andrea Quaid

Andrea Quaid's work focuses on late 20th and 21st Century North American literature, poetry and poetics, pedagogy, and feminist studies. She is co-editor of Acts + Encounters, a collection of works about experimental writing and community. She is also co-series founder and editor... Read More →
DJ

Dennis James Sweeney

Dennis James Sweeney's writing and research focus on in-between spaces and organisms: the Maltese isles, moss and lichen, the Antarctic continent, and linked short prose forms. He is the author of three chapbooks—Poems About Moss, THREATS, and What They Took Away—as well as writing... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:35pm - 3:50pm EDT
129 DeBartolo Hall

2:35pm EDT

The Book As Lyric Medium
In “Experiment as a Claim of the Book: Twenty Different Fruits on One Different Tree,” from his 2004 monograph Syncopations: The Stress of Innovation in Contemporary American Poetry, Jed Rasula argues that “the vast bulk of poetry fails to take up the challenge of the book as medium.” He then celebrates some feminist pioneers of the book-length experiment—Kimiko Hahn, Ann Lauterbach, Ann Carson, Lyn Hejinian, Joan Retallack, Harryette Mullen and fourteen others—for the political and aesthetic implications of their work in the late 90’s and early 2000’s. The ambition of this reading and panel is to expand that field to include women poets working from other traditions, to widen the scope of what’s at stake when a woman poet embarks on a long-form project, and to explore the book-length poem as an important form of literary and social activism. My ambition is that an international panel of female poets will talk about taking on the challenge of the book as lyric medium in the twenty-first century. After reading from their own book-length projects, panelists will address questions like: what provocations and urgencies are suited to the book-length sequence and what techniques are necessary to sustain a long-form project? What’s at stake, personally, politically and aesthetically? What do we gain by compounding the method of the lyric with
the narrative structure of the book? How does the long-form poem redefine notions of story and story-teller? I imagine ten-minute readings by five authors, followed by fifteen minutes of moderated conversation and ten minutes of general Q&A.



Speakers
EC

Emily Carr

Emily Carr writes murder mysteries that turn into love poems that are sometimes (by her McSweeney’s editors, for example) called divorce poems. After she got an MFA in poetry from the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, she took a doctorate in ecopoetics at the University of... Read More →
avatar for Shanna Compton

Shanna Compton

Shanna Compton is the author of Brink (Bloof, 2013), For Girls & Others (Bloof, 2008), Down Spooky (Open Book Award Winner, Winnow, 2005), and several chapbooks. Current projects include The Hazard Cycle, a book-length speculative poem, and Creature Sounds Fade, a poetry collection... Read More →
JF

Jennifer Firestone

Assistant Professor of Literary Studies, Eugene Lang College
Jennifer Firestone is the author of five books of poetry and four chapbooks including Story (UDP), Ten, (BlazeVOX [books]), Gates & Fields (Belladonna* Collaborative), Swimming Pool (DoubleCross Press), Flashes (Shearsman Books), Holiday (Shearsman Books), Waves (Portable Press at... Read More →
CR

Catie Rosemurgy

College of New Jersey
Catie Rosemurgy’s poetry collections include The Stranger Manual (2010) and My Favorite Apocalypse (2001). Her poems have been featured in the anthologies Isn’t It Romantic: 100 Love Poems by Young American Poets (2004), Poetry 30 (2005), and Best American Poetry (1997).Her... Read More →
SS

Sandra Simonds

Associate Professor of English and Humanities, Thomas University
Sandra Simonds is the author of six books of poetry: Orlando, (Wave Books, forthcoming in 2018), Further Problems with Pleasure, winner of the 2015 Akron Poetry Prize from the University of Akron Press, Steal It Back (Saturnalia Books, 2015), The Sonnets (Bloof Books, 2014), Mother... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:35pm - 3:50pm EDT
131 DeBartolo Hall

2:35pm EDT

Tracing Letters: Multimedia Poetics and the Visual Lyrical Epistolary
This panel seeks to present screenings of video poems that incorporate the visual lyrical epistolary mode. Inspired by the epistolary essay film tradition, including films like Chris Marker’s Letter from Siberia and Sans Soleil, Nguyễn Trinh Thi’s Letters from Panduranga, and Chantal Akerman’s News from Home, these video poems trace the desire and intimacy of the letter, simultaneously engaging with emotion, lyricism, thought, memory, and knowledge production. This panel will present video poems, about 15 minutes each, which function as personal letters between panel members. Laura Rascaroli writes that the epistle “generates an intimate, shared space, in which argumentation takes on a personal and inviting tone.” These video poems not only articulate the personal and poetic movement of thought, argumentation, and emotion, but also self-reflexively meditate on technology’s role in modern communication, interrogating distinctions between private and public communication broadly speaking. In the spirit of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s conception of desiring-machines, these video poems embrace yearning, transformation, chance, connection, and indeterminacy while celebrating that which breaks down or is unsounded and unsaid as a fruitful and even subversive framework for further engagement. In keeping, the panel’s video poems themselves are like vibrant and vibrating desiring-machines, both craving and carving signs of real life in the face of technological mediation. Finally, this panel is most interested in the proliferation of meaning and counternarratives within narration, centralizing voice while eschewing any final meaning or closure.

Speakers
JM

Julia Madsen

Julia Madsen is a multimedia poet and educator. She received an MFA in Literary Arts from Brown University and is currently a doctoral student in English/Creative Writing at the University of Denver. She is the video editor at REALITY BEACH, and has shown video poetry and projection... Read More →
AT

Adam Tedesco

Adam Tedesco is a founding editor of REALITY BEACH, a journal of new poetics. His video work has been shown at MoMA PS1, among other venues. His recent poetry and essays have appeared in Laurel Review, Prelude, Pouch Powderkeg, Fanzine, Fence, and elsewhere. He is the author of several... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:35pm - 3:50pm EDT
117 DeBartolo Hall

2:35pm EDT

INSIDE MY GORGE
This performance will occur twice during the session time, once at the beginning and again at 3:15 pm.

Inside my gorge combines the real-time erection and arrangement of augmented reality-based textual architectures with immersive, 3d virtual environments to construct, deconstruct, and reconstruct a poetics of queer embodiment in mixed reality. Drawing upon the word gorge to suggest a valley, an act of overindulgence, and a throat, the work explores gaps and excesses in language and the conflation of text, body and landscape. In the 1970’s, American self-taught artist Loy Bowlin designated himself "the original rhinestone cowboy." Adopting the persona from Glen Campbell’s hit song Rhinestone Cowboy, he intricately bedazzled his house, car, clothing, and dentures, creating a ubiquitous excess to compensate for a profound loneliness. Using Bowlin’s original unoriginality as a starting point, the performance appropriates sites of vernacular language and architecture in which all gaps are gorged. Bowlin's rhinestone habitat - rendered as a luminous environment derived from 3d scans - is placed in relation to auction chanting where the cumulative repetition of numbers and "filler words" becomes a fluidly stuttering drone. Other sources at play include Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine’s collaborative The Sonnet of the Hole in the Ass and Pierre Guyotat’s 1975 novel, Prostitution. Composed in an invented mixed language dialect, Guyotat's summoning of sex acts in a gay male brothel is less narrative than linguistic secretion, a distinctive outpouring of self-same written material and displaced punctuation comprising an extravagant verbivisivoco ambience. Using solicitous flows of embodied language to create dazzling environments, Inside My Gorge enacts cuts and disappearing acts between the body, language and space.



Speakers
AA

Abraham Avnisan

Abraham Avnisan is an experimental writer and new media artist whose work is situated at the intersection of image, text, and code. He creates mobile apps, new media installations and mixed reality performances that seek to subvert dominant narratives through embodied encounters with... Read More →
MJ

Mark Jeffery

Mark Jeffery is a Chicago based performance/installation artist, visual choreographer, and curator of the citywide In>Time performance festival. Since 1994, Jeffery has developed unconventional collaborations with visual artists, scholars, video artists, sound artists, new media and... Read More →
avatar for Judd Morrissey

Judd Morrissey

Associate Professor, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Judd Morrissey is a writer and code artist who creates poetic systems across a range of platforms incorporating electronic writing, internet art, live performance, and augmented reality. He is the creator of digital literary works including The Precession: An 80 Foot Long Internet... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:35pm - 3:50pm EDT
140 DeBartolo Hall

2:35pm EDT

Friends of JEF Reading
Eckhard Gerdes will host a reading by JEF authors Yuriy Tarnawsky, Brion Poloncic, Jane L. Carman, and Jim Meirose.

Moderators
avatar for Eckhard Gerdes

Eckhard Gerdes

Publisher, JEF Books/Depth Charge Publishing
Novelist Eckhard Gerdes edits and publishes the Journal of Experimental Fiction and JEF Books.

Speakers
JL

Jane L. Carman

Jane L. Carman is the founder of the Festival of Language, a reading eXperiment, Lit Fest Press, and is author of the innovative novel "Tangled in Motion."
JM

Jim Meiros

Jim Meirose's short work has appeared in numerous venues, and his published novels will include the forthcoming "Understanding Franklin Thompson," due from JEF books in fall 2018.
BP

Brion Poloncic

Brion Poloncic is a musician, a gifted visual artist, and author of the imaginative work "Psychedelic Everest."
YT

Yuriy Tarnawsky

Yuriy Tarnawsky has authored some three dozen books of poetry, fiction, drama, essays, and translations in English and Ukrainian, including the novels Meningitis and Three Blondes and Death, the collections of short stories Short Tails and Crocodile Smiles, three collections of mininovels... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:35pm - 3:50pm EDT
138 DeBartolo Hall

4:00pm EDT

De-Re-Forming Pop Culture: Innovative Approaches to Post-Internet Writing
A reading featuring poets and fiction writers working with found material from social media, websites, TV reality shows, video games and more. . . How can innovative writing intervene in the constant flow of likes, posts, images, information and commodities that algorithmically fills our lives under late capitalism? Where is meaning to be found in this context – or generated? From Facebook to Hoarders to Koko the Gorilla and mass shootings, panelists present new ways of looking at our everyday media landscape in all its splendor, kitsch and horror. Reading will be followed by a discussion that teases out the subversive formal and political dimensions of the work, with special attention to questions of satire, pastiche, polyvocality, digital excess, overconsumption, environmental collapse and gun violence.

Speakers
KD

Kate Durbin

Visiting Professor, Whittier College
Kate Durbin is a Los Angeles-based artist and writer. Her books include the forthcoming HOARDERS (Gramma), E! Entertainment (Wonder), The Ravenous Audience (Akashic Books), and the collaboration ABRA (1913 Press). ABRA is also a free, interactive iOS app that is "a living text," which... Read More →
avatar for Becca Klaver

Becca Klaver

Robert P. Dana Emerging Writer Fellow, Cornell College
Becca Klaver is the author of two books of poetry—LA Liminal (Kore Press) and Empire Wasted (Bloof Books)—and several chapbooks. Her critical writing appears in College Literature, Angels of the Americlypse: New Latin@ Writing, and elsewhere. As an editor, she cofounded Switchback... Read More →
WL

Wiliam Lessard

William Lessard is a writer and critic based in New York. His writing has appeared in McSweeney’s, Brooklyn Rail, Hyperallergic, Prelude, PANK, and Heavy Feather Review. His visual work has been featured at MoMA PS 1. With Mary Boo Anderson, he is editing an anthology of Brooklyn... Read More →
JS

Janet Sarbanes

CalArts
Janet Sarbanes is the author of the short story collections Army of One and The Protester Has Been Released. Recent short fiction appears in Black Clock, P-Queue, Entropy and North Dakota Quarterly. A 2017 recipient of the Creative Capital/Andy Warhol art writer’s grant, Sarbanes... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:00pm - 5:20pm EDT
140 DeBartolo Hall

4:00pm EDT

FC2 Board Reading
FC2: Board Reading
This flash reading brings together the current editorial board of FC2. Each of the eight readers will give a short reading from one of their recent works, demonstrating the aesthetic variety and multiplicity of formal and thematic concerns, styles and preoccupations of the press. With forty four years of experience, well over 100 authors and over 200 books in print, FC2 remains at the vanguard of innovative and experimental fiction publication.

Co-moderated by Jeffrey DeShell and Joanna Ruocco.

Moderators
JD

Jeffrey DeShell

Jeffrey DeShell is the author of six novels, mostly recent Expectation (2013) and Arthouse (2011), and a critical book, The Peculiarity of Literature: An Allegorical Approach to Poe’s Fiction. He has co-edited two collections of fiction by American women, Chick-Lit I: Postfeminist... Read More →
JR

Joanna Ruocco

Joanna Ruocco is a prize-winning American author and co-editor of the fiction journal Birkensnake. In 2013, she received the Pushcart Prize for her story "If the Man Took” and is also winner of the Catherine Doctorow Innovative Fiction Prize. Ruocco received her MFA at Brown, and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Blackman

Sarah Blackman

Sarah Blackman is the Director of Creative Writing at the Fine Arts Center, a public arts high school in Greenville, South Carolina where she lives with the poet John Pursley, III and their two daughters. She is the founding editor of Crashtest, an online magazine for high-school... Read More →
NH

Noy Holland

Noy Holland is the recipient of the 2018 Katherine Anne Porter Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Her latest book, I Was Trying to Describe What It Feels Like, New and Selected Stories, was published by Counterpoint in January 2017. Her novel, Bird (Counterpoint... Read More →
avatar for Michael Mejia

Michael Mejia

Associate Professor, University of Utah
Author of the novels TOKYO and Forgetfulness, Editor-in-Chief @ Western Humanities Review, Co-founding editor @ Ninebark Press, Associate Professor @ U of Utah
avatar for Lance Olsen

Lance Olsen

Professor & Author, University of Utah
Lance Olsen is author of more than 25 books of and about innovative writing, including, most recently, the novel Dreamlives of Debris (Dzanc, 2017). A Guggenheim, Berlin Prize, D.A.A.D. Artist-in-Berlin Residency, N.E.A. Fellowship, and Pushcart Prize recipient, as well as a Fulbright... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Roberson

Matthew Roberson

CMU
Matthew Roberson is the author of three novels, 1998.6, Impotent , and List, all from FC2. His short fiction has appeared in Fourteen Hills, Fiction International, Clackamas Literary Review, Western Humanities Review, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and others.  Matthew Roberson... Read More →
ES

Elisabeth Sheffield

Elisabeth Sheffield is the author of three novels, all published by FC2: Helen Keller Really Lived (2014), Fort Da: A Report (2009), and Gone (2003). Additionally, her work has appeared in various venues such as Ploughshares, the Denver Quarterly, Pretext, 13th Moon, Gulf Coast and... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:00pm - 5:20pm EDT
102 DeBartolo Hall

4:00pm EDT

Mixed Panel 1
Roderick Coover and Scott Rettberg, "Poems and Scenes from the Anthropocene"
This will be a 15-20 minute presentation of the book Electronic Literature, forthcoming from Polity in November 2018. The presentation will focus on connections between experimental traditions in print and forms of electronic literature such as poetry generators and hypertext fiction. It will consider the place of electronic literature in the landscape of contemporary creative writing programs and will include a reading of some short passages from the book. About the book: Electronic Literature considers new forms and genres of writing that exploit the capabilities of computers and networks – literature that would not be possible without the contemporary digital context.In this book, Rettberg places the most significant genres of electronic literature in historical, technological, and cultural contexts. These include hypertext fiction, combinatory poetics, interactive fiction (and other game-based digital literary work), kinetic and interactive poetry, and networked writing based on our collective experience of the Internet. Rettberg argues that electronic literature demands to be read both through the lens of experimental literary practices dating back to the early twentieth century and through the specificities of the technology and software used to produce the work. “Electronic Literature demonstrates rare common sense and an encyclopedic knowledge of works, theory, contexts, and criticism. This is a significant and important book by the field’s founder that will be the definitive work on electronic literature now and for many years to come.” --Katherine Hayles, Duke University

Judith Goldman, "Extinction Sinks: Theorizing Media, Nihilism, and Care in 21C African American Poetry"
This brief talk will consider Danez Smith’s Don’t Call Us Dead (2017) and Claudia Rankine’s Don't Let Me Be Lonely (2004) in light of these works’ historical material theorizing around the entwinement of media, affect, power, and race. Smith’s book opens with a long poem that performatively tropes on age-old graveyard technologies of address and reanimation, connecting site-specific epitaphs to indefinitely, virtually circulating hashtags, death-markers of social media bearing names of black men murdered by police. As this visionary poem critiques and reinvents socio-political mechanics around lyric deixis, what emerges is a utopian zone beyond life and death: a space congruent to undead textuality itself and an “impossible,” paradisical realm of a black homosociality relations of care and love, beyond policing, capture, and necropolitics. Rankine’s book portrays how mass media, namely television, contributes to the prevalent phenomena in which African Americans function as sinks or depositories for the negative affect of whites, becoming in turn both targets of paranoiac rage as well as subjects of depression so profound it effaces the distinction between life and death. The radical disavowal of this racial affective labor is brilliantly anatomized by Rankine in part through her portrayal of how psychopharmaceuticals are prescribed to annul racial nihilism, as a form of medicalized socio-political repression/erasure that masquerades as care.

Valerie Sayers, "Apocalypse, Ho! A Genre Mash-up and Choral Reading"
If futurist fiction's the new realism, what's an innovative writer to do? I propose a multi-media choral reading of my apocalyptic cowpoke prose sonnet, "Our Last Stand," a genre mash-up that pulverizes high and low, poetry and prose, the sacred and the profane, ex-pat queer Irish-Americans and their adopted country (an island suspiciously resembling Ireland). Gerard Manley Hopkins meets Kevin Barry! Sodom meets Gomorrah! Sublime meets ridiculous! Set in a too-near future when climate change renders temperate zones the sites of droughts, floods, and fights to the death, "Our Last Stand" will appear in the fall 2018 issue of Agni and is a recent addition to my cycle of fictions set in the future but finding new forms to bypass "realist" futurism. "Our Last Stand" is constructed, like any self-respecting prose sonnet, in fourteen short parts. Because the narrator, Tommy, so frequently invokes a collective first-person plural voice, I plan to read with a chorus of pre-recorded voices, with an accompanying visual background that combines video footage and graphic elements (including lines from Hopkins and Barry). The story's under three thousand words and reads in twenty minutes; with introductory remarks, the entire presentation will total twenty-five minutes. The only equipment needed is standard video/sound projection.




Speakers
JG

Judith Goldman

Poetics Program, Dept. of English, University of Buffalo (SUNY)
Judith Goldman is the author of Vocoder (Roof), Deathstar/Rico-chet (O Books), l.b.; or, catenaries (Krupskaya), and agon (The Operating System). Her current project _______ Mt. [blank mount]: "Mont Blanc" + Mont Blanc / light + color / grieving Earth writes through past futures and... Read More →
SR

Scott Rettberg

University of Bergen
Scott Rettberg is Professor of Digital Culture in the department of linguistic, literary, and aesthetic studies at the University of Bergen, Norway. Rettberg is the author or coauthor of novel-length works of electronic literature, combinatory poetry, and films including The Unknown... Read More →
avatar for Valerie Sayers

Valerie Sayers

University of Notre Dame
Valerie Sayers is the author of six novels, most recently The Powers, and hundreds of stories, essays, and reviews. Winner of an NEA and two Pushcart Prizes, she teaches in the Creative Writing Program and English Department at Notre Dame, where she founded the Notre Dame Review... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:00pm - 5:20pm EDT
119 DeBartolo Hall

4:00pm EDT

Mixed Panel 4
Lauren Russell, ""Descent": An “Encounter with Nothing” Takes Form(s)--A Reading "
In 2013, I acquired a copy of my great-great-grandfather’s diary. Robert Wallace (“Bob”) Hubert was a Captain in the Confederate Army. After his return from the Civil War, he fathered twenty children by three of his former slaves, who were also sisters. One of those children was my great-grandmother. As I transcribed the 225-page diary, I became interested in its omissions and decided to write into the space of what is missing. In "Lose Your Mother," Saidiya Hartman writes, “I was determined to fill in the blank spaces of the historical record and to represent the lives of those deemed unworthy of remembering, but how does one write a story about an encounter with nothing?” In "Descent," my reckoning with this part of my family history, I adopt Hartman’s question as a formal challenge. What forms might “an encounter with nothing” take? What surfaces when I excavate the language beneath the words in Bob Hubert’s diary, as in my poem “Whippoorwill”? What does a formal constraint like iambic pentameter produce when lent to the voice of my great-great-grandmother Peggy, who, like the “saints” in Alice Walker’s “In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens,” must have exercised her creativity within the confines of her life? Descent is a hybrid work of verse, prose, images, documents; traditional and innovative forms. Following in the footsteps of poets like M. NourbeSe Phillip, my reading, as a textual and vocal enactment, will raise questions around what emerges when we give an “encounter with nothing” form.

Travis Sharp, "Does that make me crazy?": Bob the Drag Queen's Radical Aesthetics
Aesthetics and politics are prominent in many Marxist theories of the avant-garde, with aesthetics and politics being alternately read as incommensurable and mutually exclusive or as necessarily in dialectical or mutually deterministic relation, as autonomous spheres, as an autonomy-in-heteronomy, or as tools to be put to use in the revolution. Absent in many of these narratives are any integral inclusions of race. Susan Ferguson, in “Intersectionality and Social-Reproduction Feminisms,” argues against the Marxist tendency to subsume race under the sign of class and for the displacement of outdated notions of class and intersectionality in favor of a social reproduction theory; while her interest lies primarily in social reproductive feminism, she notes that this has profound implications for race, which must be understood as integral and interior to class, not relegated beneath it. Similarly, this presentation offers readings of performances/texts that consider race as an integral category in the dialectic of aesthetics and politics. Specifically, I will show and discuss Bob the Drag Queen’s covers of Gnarls Barkley’s “Crazy” and Britney Spears’ “I’m a Slave 4 U,” which interrogate the aesthetics/politics of the original songs and their lip synched iterations, including the relationship between black performer and white audience, the slippages between person and persona within drag, and the politics of race and place in primarily white queer venues. Given the tradition of considering the avant-garde as that which integrates the artistic into the praxis of life, it is crucial to consider drag performances as key contemporary avant-garde gestures.

Harvey Thomlinson, "A Different Language: The Strike "
Recent research by Lera Boroditsky and others have revived interest in the question of how intricately language shapes our thought, and in the practice of fiction writing in the modernist tradition which tries to hack linguistic templates. Standard syntax implies conceptual relations, such as causality, which as the linguist Peter Kay suggests, shape the way we ‘compartmentalize reality’. My project The Strike purposively misuses language to create a mimesis for readers of the temporal fissures of a remote ice-bound Chinese border town torn apart by an underground strike. The experimental sentences subvert correspondences between syntactic and semantic structures and has been described as a kind of idioglossia that shakes up the synapses of readers. The real aim, though, was to help readers understand the world of the novel and all the meanings it contains. In my session I will read fragments and draw on perspectives from multiple disciplines to present a taxonomy of syntactical templates from the text which share a consistent goal to destabilise the sentence. There may be a resonance with phenomenology, as practiced by Merleau-Ponty and others, which tried to relate experience without obscuring the description through misused concepts.

Speakers
LR

Lauren Russell

Center for African American Poetry & Poetics, University of Pittsburg
Lauren Russell is the author of What’s Hanging on the Hush (Ahsahta, 2017). She was the 2014-2015 Jay C. and Ruth Halls Poetry Fellow at the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, the 2016 VIDA Fellow to the Home School, a 2017 National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing... Read More →
TS

Travis Sharp

University of Buffalo, SUNY
Travis Sharp is a poet, book artist, and teacher living in Buffalo, NY, the writer of the chapbook Sinister Queer Agenda (above/ground press, forthcoming), co-editor of Radio: 11.8.16 (Essay Press, 2017), and a PhD student in the SUNY Buffalo Poetics Program. He's also a teaching... Read More →
HT

Harvey Thomlinson

Originally from the UK, Harvey Thomlinson is best known as a translator of novels by rebellious Chinese writers including Murong Xuecun and Chen Xiwo. Harvey’s translations (and occasional columns) have also been published in New York Times and the Guardian. His own innovative writing... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:00pm - 5:20pm EDT
120 DeBartolo Hall

4:00pm EDT

New Methods. Instagram. Play: Performing a Critical Avant-Garde
This critical chimera includes performative readings on and about dramatic, digital, and literary texts to stage self-reflexive inquiries into the very forms and purposes of contemporary critical practice(s). In other words, this panel includes drama about drama, Instagram about Instagram, fictoessay about fictoessay. Lance Norman’s piece performs a critical monologue considering authenticity and the New Method in the monologues of Spalding Gray. Norman’s piece reflects on the various ways Gray’s New Method is both a critique and emulation of Lee Strasberg's popularization of the acting theories of Konstantin Stanislavski to contemplate the ways performance might shape reality more than simply reflect it. Cori Wong’s piece will insta-gram the creative possibilities for liberatory community building through a performance of critical-selfhood on Instagram. Her work explores the relationship between the performing subject, digital correspondence, and the capacity for transformative learning. Kristina Quynn’s piece enacts the critic-as-narrator in Ali Smith’s Cambridge lectures, Artful. Quynn's work considers how creative-critical work might produce new play-ful forms and unconventional reading subjects. Theories/themes of self-reflexivity, performance, and critical connections bring these pieces together to focus on the value of the enacted, the hybrid, and the effervescent for contemporary critical practice. Given that the avant-garde—as we are loosely using the term—is often an attempt to represent, renew, or transform the margins of textual/artistic form, this panel deliberately pushes the avant-garde to consider criticism’s frontline. In doing so, we invite a rich Q&A session to consider the productive intersections between creative, expressive modes and critical practice.

Speakers
LN

Lance Norman

Lance Norman is Professor of English at Lansing Community College.  His research focuses on Modern Drama, Performance, and Film.  His published work has considered many diverse figures of the modern and contemporary stage including Harold Pinter, Martin McDonagh, G. B. Shaw, Eugene... Read More →
KQ

Kristina Quynn

Kristina Quynn teaches at Colorado State University, where she also directs CSU Writes. Her research interests include transnational (post)modernisms, self-reflexivity in women’s writing, and emerging areas of performative literary criticism. She is co-editor of Reading and Writing... Read More →
CW

Cori Wong

Cori Wong serves as Assistant Vice President for Gender Equity in the Office of the Vice President for Diversity at Colorado State University and leads the Women & Gender Collaborative, a Presidential initiative to improve the campus culture and climate around gender. Passionate about... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:00pm - 5:20pm EDT
117 DeBartolo Hall

4:00pm EDT

Resistant Narratives / Resisting Narrative
What does it mean to write resistance? How can a book / fiction / essay / poem / performance be a site of refusal and possibility? Contemporary writers have long created literary spaces of possibility and resistance, taking the status of outsider and expanding the project of literature. Resistant narratives respond to and rewrite the stories/ideas/constraints we have received from a culture that wishes to reduce and limit our very souls. To become an artist is to write oneself back into being. A book might be a place where the individual remakes the world. In this panel which will include reading, discussion, and performance, we will consider writing as political resistance, a tool to counter the limitations of cultural, societal and familial expectation.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Anne

Jessica Anne

Jessica Anne is the author of A Manual For Nothing (Noemi Press), she's also an alumna of The Neo-Futurist ensemble. Anne edits Nonfiction for MAKE Literary Magazine, and serves as an artistic director for MAKE Magazine Productions' biannual Lit & Luz Festival, a celebration of literature... Read More →
SC

Sydni Chiles

Sydni Chiles is a person, black and queer, existing on the Southside of Chicago with an MFA in Creative Writing from Roosevelt University. She’s also the great great niece of Lorraine Hansberry who, like her, is a writer from the South Side, an activist and quite literallly an “undocumented... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Goldblatt

Amanda Goldblatt

Amanda Goldblatt lives in Chicago, where she teaches creative writing at Northeastern Illinois University. Her work is forthcoming or has recently appeared in NOON, Diagram, Puerto del Sol, and elsewhere. She is a 2018 NEA Creative Writing Fellow. Hard Mouth, her debut novel, is forthcoming... Read More →
avatar for Suzanne Scanlon

Suzanne Scanlon

Writer
Suzanne Scanlon is the author of two books, Promising Young Women (Dorothy, 2012) and Her Thirty-Seventh Year, An Index (Noemi, 2015). Her Thirty-Seventh Year was recently featured in a show at The Museum of Modern Art in New York City, and a Swedish translation was published in late... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:00pm - 5:20pm EDT
136 DeBartolo Hall

4:00pm EDT

Anger, Grief, Empathy, and Hope: Remembering Marthe Reed as Activist and Social Justice Poet
In The Poethical Wager, Joan Retallack points out that, given our "complexly interrelational" situation ("from weather to neural networks to all forms of culture, there are so many variables, that large-scale or even modestly scaled predictive accuracy is impossible"), "the level of individual agency, the effects of any one person’s actions or work … are quite mysterious." In this panel we explore, from a variety of perspectives and through collaborative practices, how the work of Marthe Reed merges writing, activism for social justice, and pedagogy. Reed was a poet and person who, in committing to her belief in justice for all people across racial, economic, and other lines, worked to change social structures and attitudes. We reflect on her work as an environmental and social justice activist and writer, as a teacher and mentor, as a person who had ongoing relationships and projects with writers and activists around the country. We explore her influence through video interviews with those who were affected by her; we reflect on her example of ways of being in the world, merging activism and poetry in a kind of ethopoetics, acting as an artistic and pedagogical influence that ripples through to our own students; we explore how she merged the fight for environmental justice with contemporary racial and social politics; and we highlight the anger, grief, empathy and hope that fueled the collaborative curating process of Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing Within the Anthropocene, edited by Reed and Linda Russo. Marthe died in April, 2018; she was only 59.

Speakers
CC

C.S. Carrier

C.S. Carrier is the author of several poetry chapbooks and two full-length poetry collections, After Dayton (Four Way Books) and Mantle (H-NGM-N Books). He has an MFA in poetry from the Program for Poets and Writers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and a PhD in English from... Read More →
JD

Jill Darling

Jill Darling has an MFA in creative writing and a Ph.D. in twentieth century literature and cultural studies, and is the author of (re)iteration(s) (Spuyten Duyvil), a geography of syntax (Lavender Ink), Solve For (BlazeVOX, ebooks), and begin with may: a series of moments (Finishing... Read More →
DT

Dana Teen Lomax

Dana Teen Lomax is a poet, filmmaker, and educator. Her recent project THE BEAUTIFUL is forthcoming from Black Radish Books; together with Jennifer Firestone, she edited Letters to Poets: Conversations About Poetics, Politics, and Community (Saturnalia) which Cornel West called a... Read More →
LR

Linda Russo

Linda Russo is the author of several books of poetry, including Participant (Lost Roads Press), and To Think of her Writing Awash in Light (Subito Press), a collection of lyrical essays. Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing Within the Anthropocene, a collaborative glossary... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:00pm - 5:20pm EDT
126 DeBartolo Hall

4:00pm EDT

Poetic Weapons
Poetry is not an answer— it is a space for working things out speculatively. How can ideas on the page be drawn out and used actively as weapons against what would destroy us? Just as a gambler makes a confident wager on an impossible bet, poetry can assume a win even when the odds are against us, generating a space of new possibilities in which to move. Our wager is this: Even as avant-garde art is constantly recuperated and sold back to us in gift shops, poetry offers a multitude of poetic weapons which act as defiant tools in transitions and crises—through foam, objects, ambivalence, excess, garbage, swarms, and more—and which allow lines of flight to begin forming.

In our panel/ activity, we would like to offer ideas and examples of poetic weapons in specific poems and other literature and also discuss how they have been/ could be deployed in marches, occupations, daily resistance, and other political topographies. We will frame our presentation through a participatory engagement with the audience, possibly through a writing exercise, movements and gestures, or speculative acts that assume the existence of a desired reality.

Speakers
WB

Woogee Bae

Woogee Bae is an MFA candidate in Creative Writing and Poetics at the University of Washington Bothell. Her works have appeared in P-QUEUE, Small Po[r]tions, Peach Mag, and elsewhere.
DM

Dana Middleton

Dana Middleton writes poetry formed in anti-state/ queer/ speculative engagements. They are currently pursuing an MFA in Creative Writing and Poetics at the University of Washington Bothell.
NA

Nathan Alexander Moore

Nathan Alexander Moore is a genderfluid writer, scholar and dreamer. He is interested in critical and creative methods to explore the nuances of blackness, queerness, memory, history, identity and trauma. He recently graduated from SUNY Buffalo with Master degrees in both Innovative... Read More →
NW

Nabel Wallin

Nabel Wallin is a non-traditional undergraduate student at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wa, where he studies literature and philosophy.


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:00pm - 5:20pm EDT
138 DeBartolo Hall

4:00pm EDT

LINE BY LINE: A Collaborative Performance
Founded in 2005, Red Rover Series {readings that play with reading} features a diversity of renowned creative minds. Each Chicago-based event is designed as a reading experiment with some level of collaboration and/or audience participation. For the &NOW 2018 performance, the curators will devise an interactive collaboration so all &NOW participants have the opportunity to improvise in live space and time together. This session will involve writers reading with and to each other, creating careful choices about how to be together, communicate, make, take, and share space. Writers will determine their own entrance and exit points multiple times during the event in order to read their writing with and to each other, using each line of their writing to create new, collaborative work with the other participants. Red Rover Series has hosted similar large-scale readings for the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (2014), the MLA conference (2014), the &NOW festival (2015), and the New Orleans Poetry Festival (2018). The series has confirmed 18 collaborators for &NOW 2018 and will continue to recruit readers up to the time of the festival. Our goal is to foster innovative forms and aesthetic solidarities with this year’s &NOW community.

Moderators
avatar for Laura Goldstein

Laura Goldstein

Laura Goldstein's first collection of poetry, loaded arc, was released by Trembling Pillow Press in 2013 and her second collection, awesome camera was published by Make Now Press in 2014. She has also published several chapbooks with vibrant small presses across the country, the most... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Karmin

Jennifer Karmin

Curator, Red Rover Series
Jennifer Karmin’s multidisciplinary work has transpired at festivals, artist-run spaces, and on city streets across the U.S., Cuba, Japan, Kenya, and Europe. Performance venues range from the Poetry Project, the Walker Art Center, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, and Woodland... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Harold Abramowitz

Harold Abramowitz

Charles R. Drew University
Harold Abramowitz’s books include Blind Spot, Not Blessed, Dear Dearly Departed, and Man’s Wars And Wickedness: A Book of Proposed Remedies & Extreme Formulations for Curing Hostility, Rivalry, & Ill-Will (with Amanda Ackerman). Harold co-edits the short-form literary press eohippus... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Castro Almandina

Melissa Castro Almandina

Editor, Brown and Proud Press
Melissa Castro Almandina is a Xicana poet & artist from the South Side of Chicago. She’s an editor at Brown and Proud Press, a zine collective that serves to heal the POC community. She holds a residency at AMFM Gallery where she teaches poetry workshops. She released her zine of... Read More →
TA

Toby Altman

Toby Altman is the author of Arcadia, Indiana (Plays Inverse, 2017) and five chapbooks, including Security Theater (Present Tense Pamphlets, 2016) and Tender Industrial Fabric (Greying Ghost, 2015). His poems can or will be found in Colorado Review, Jubilat, Lana Turner, and other... Read More →
CC

cris cheek

cris cheek is a transatlantic documentary performance writer, sound composer and photographer. He worked alongside Bob Cobbing and Bill Griffiths with the Consortium of London Presses in the mid 1970s to run a thriving open access print shop for indie poets. In 1981 he co-founded... Read More →
OC

Olivia Cronk

Olivia Cronk is the author of Louise and Louise and Louise (The Lettered Streets Press, 2016) and Skin Horse (Action Books, 2012). With Philip Sorenson, she edits The Journal Petra. She lives in Chicago and teaches writing at Northeastern Illinois University.
AC

Aja Couchois Duncan

Aja Couchois Duncan is a Bay Area educator, writer and coach of Ojibwe, French and Scottish descent. Her writing has been anthologized in Biting the Error: Writers Explore Narrative (Coach House Press,) Bay Poetics (Faux Press) and Love Shook My Heart 2 (Alyson Press). Her debut collection... Read More →
SG

Sara Goodman

Sara Goodman is a new media artist, poet, curator, VJ, and teacher working with new and old tech, forming lifelong friendships and collaborations based off of art-as- way-of-life life practice. She is drawn to pastoral landscapes, abstraction, meaning through repetition, science fiction... Read More →
IH

Ian Hatcher

Ian Hatcher is a writer, vocalist, performer, and programmer whose work explores cognition in the context of digital systems. He has performed at Artists Space, e-flux, The Kitchen, Fondation Louis Vuitton, the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the Alexandrinsky Theater in St. Petersburg... Read More →
avatar for Marcy Rae Henry

Marcy Rae Henry

Marcy Rae Henry is a Latina born and raised in Mexican-America/The Borderlands. Her work has received a Chicago Community Arts Assistance Grant and an Illinois Arts Council Fellowship. Recent publications include writing and visual art in Newcity, FlowerSong Books’ Selena Anthology... Read More →
avatar for Jose-Luis Moctezuma

Jose-Luis Moctezuma

Jose-Luis Moctezuma is a Mexican-American poet, translator, instructor, and editor. His poetry and criticism have been published in Jacket2, Chicago Review, Big Bridge, MAKE Magazine, PALABRA, FlashPoint, Cerise Press, and elsewhere. His chapbook, Spring Tlaloc Seance, was published... Read More →
LM

Laura Mullen

Laura Mullen is the author of eight books: Complicated Grief was published in 2015. Recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in the anthologies Poesia Visual 5, and Ritual and Capital. An artist’s book, Verge (a collaboration with John David O’Brien) was produced in 2018, and... Read More →
avatar for blake nemec

blake nemec

I'm a queer, transgender, writer, teacher, health care worker and sound artist who lives in Chicago. Sharing Plastic is my hybrid poetry & fiction book debut and I have long worked as a sound recordist in queer independent movies such as the documentary FREE CeCE! 
SP

Soham Patel

University of Georgia, Athens
Soham Patel is a Kundiman fellow and an assistant editor at Fence and The Georgia Review. Her chapbooks include and nevermind the storm (Portable Press @ Yo-Yo Labs, 2013) New Weather Drafts (Portable Press @ Yo-Yo Labs, 2016), and in airplane and other poems (oxeye, 2018). She is... Read More →
KR

Kenyatta Rogers

Kenyatta Rogers is a Cave Canem Fellow and has been twice awarded scholarships from the Breadloaf Writers' Conference. He has also been nominated twice for both Pushcart and Best of the Net prizes. His work has been previously published in or is forthcoming from Jubilat, Vinyl, Bat... Read More →
MS

Melissa Severin

Melissa Severin is the author of Brute Fact and Atlas of Essential Monsters (dancing girl press, 2008 and 2017). Like Wallace Stevens and T.S. Eliot, she’s a poet with a day job (comparisons stop there). In her career, she uses her poetry skills to create meaningful marketing communications... Read More →
PS

Philip Sorenson

Philip Sorenson is the author of two full-length collections, Of Embodies (Rescue Press, 2012) and Solar Trauma (Rescue Press, 2018), and a forthcoming shorter work, New Recordings (Another New Calligraphy, 2018). He is the co-editor, with Olivia Cronk, of The Journal Petra.
avatar for Connie Voisine

Connie Voisine

Professor, New Mexico State University
Author most recently of "And God Created Women" and "The Bower."
TW

Terri Witek

Terri Witek is the author most recently of The Rape Kit, winner of the 2017 Slope Editions Prize judged by Dawn Lundy Martin. Her poetry often traces the breakages between words and images, and she has collaborated with Brazilian visual artist Cyriaco Lopes (cyriacolopes.com) since... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:00pm - 5:20pm EDT
131 DeBartolo Hall

4:00pm EDT

How Now We Need This Global Avant-Garde
Writers from different global cultures will read from their work. To connect, to expand, to invite, to be open and to be opened by

Speakers
RB

Rafal Betlejewski

Rafal Betlejewski is a well-known Polish writer, paratheatrical artist, radio commentator,photographer, and political activist. His first novel will come out next year. In 2015, he co-established the collaborative, "Medium Public Radio." His public performance political activities... Read More →
MN

Martin Nakell

Chapman University
Winner of a Gertrude Stein Award in Poetry, Martin Nakell has published The Myth of Creation (poetry, Parentheses Writing), Ramon (fiction, Jawbone Press/The National Endowment for the Arts), The Library of Thomas Rivka (fiction, Sun & Moon), Two Fields that Face & Mirror Each Other... Read More →
TN

Tyler Nesbitt

Tyler Nesbitt comes from the Cherokee and Navajo Nations. A graduate of Chapman University with a BFA in poetry, his first book, "The Hydroponic Wall," is forthcoming next year. He currently lives in Orange, California, where he works on sustainable living architecture.


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:00pm - 5:20pm EDT
129 DeBartolo Hall

7:00pm EDT

Featured Reading
Renee Gladman is a writer and artist preoccupied with lines, crossings, thresholds, and geographies as they play out in the interstices of poetry and prose. She is the author of eleven published works, including a cycle of novels about the city-state Ravicka and its inhabitants, the Ravickians—Event Factory (2010), The Ravickians (2011), Ana Patova Crosses a Bridge (2013), and Houses of Ravicka (2017)—as well as the recently released Prose Architectures, her first monograph of drawings, and Calamities, a collection of linked auto-essays on the intersections of writing, drawing, and community, which won the 2017 CLMP Firecracker Award for Creative Non-Fiction.

Johanna Drucker, Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies at UCLA, is internationally known for her work in the history of graphic design, typography, experimental poetry, fine art, and digital humanities. Recent publications include What Is? (Cuneiform Press, 2013), Graphesis: Visual Forms of Knowledge Production (Harvard University Press, 2014), and Digital_Humanities , co-authored with Anne Burdick, Peter Lunenfeld, Todd Presner, and Jeffrey Schnapp, (MIT Press, 2012). In 2012, Drucker’s creative work was the subject of a retrospective, Druckworks: 40 years of books and projects. She is working on a database memoire, ALL the books I never wrote or wrote and never published.

Speakers
JD

Johanna Drucker

Johanna Drucker, Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies at UCLA, is internationally known for her work in the history of graphic design, typography, experimental poetry, fine art, and digital humanities. Recent publications include What Is?(Cuneiform Press, 2013), Graphesis... Read More →
RG

Renee Gladman

Renee Gladman is a writer and artist preoccupied with lines, crossings, thresholds, and geographies as they play out in the interstices of poetry and prose. She is the author of eleven published works, including a cycle of novels about the city-state Ravicka and its inhabitants, the... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 7:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
McKenna Hall

8:15pm EDT

Reception Immediately following Featured Reading
Renee Gladman is a writer and artist preoccupied with lines, crossings, thresholds, and geographies as they play out in the interstices of poetry and prose. She is the author of eleven published works, including a cycle of novels about the city-state Ravicka and its inhabitants, the Ravickians—Event Factory (2010), The Ravickians (2011), Ana Patova Crosses a Bridge (2013), and Houses of Ravicka (2017)—as well as the recently released Prose Architectures, her first monograph of drawings, and Calamities, a collection of linked auto-essays on the intersections of writing, drawing, and community, which won the 2017 CLMP Firecracker Award for Creative Non-Fiction.

Johanna Drucker, Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies at UCLA, is internationally known for her work in the history of graphic design, typography, experimental poetry, fine art, and digital humanities. Recent publications include What Is? (Cuneiform Press, 2013), Graphesis: Visual Forms of Knowledge Production (Harvard University Press, 2014), and Digital_Humanities , co-authored with Anne Burdick, Peter Lunenfeld, Todd Presner, and Jeffrey Schnapp, (MIT Press, 2012). In 2012, Drucker’s creative work was the subject of a retrospective, Druckworks: 40 years of books and projects. She is working on a database memoire, ALL the books I never wrote or wrote and never published.

Speakers
JD

Johanna Drucker

Johanna Drucker, Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies at UCLA, is internationally known for her work in the history of graphic design, typography, experimental poetry, fine art, and digital humanities. Recent publications include What Is?(Cuneiform Press, 2013), Graphesis... Read More →
RG

Renee Gladman

Renee Gladman is a writer and artist preoccupied with lines, crossings, thresholds, and geographies as they play out in the interstices of poetry and prose. She is the author of eleven published works, including a cycle of novels about the city-state Ravicka and its inhabitants, the... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 8:15pm - 9:15pm EDT
McKenna Hall
 
Sunday, October 7
 

9:00am EDT

Experimental Thrillers: What Dunnit?!
The conventions of the traditional thriller employ a patriarchal mode where suspense is managed, creating a trajectory that builds to climax in which previously inexplicable plot events become fully mansplained. In experimental thrillers, such a path becomes an orbit rather than a strict narrative; these thrillers thrive when nothing is revealed and the reader is, instead, led into an experience of increasing stress, uncertainty, and trauma, until her own psychic boundaries are crossed and a realm of true mystery penetrated. Our quotidian sense of the world is not reinforced, as in the masculine realism of the traditional thriller, but shaken until we begin to question our very ability to read clues and create order out of language. In this proposed event, we will begin with a quick exploration of the secret lineage of the experimental thriller, including seminal works by Kafka, Grand Master Margaret Millar, and Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. Each writer will further expound on a particular element of the experimental thriller and perform an artwork-in-progress that strives to demonstrate convention-shattering principles such as climax deferral, plot ruin, dialogue obfuscation, and anti-characterization.

Speakers
JA

Jessica Alexander

Jessica Alexander’s story collection, Dear Enemy, was the winning manuscript in the 2016 Subito Prose Contest, as judged by Selah Saterstrom. Her fiction has been published in journals such as Fence, Black Warrior Review, PANK, Denver Quarterly, The Collagist, and DIAGRAM. She lives... Read More →
AF

Afsheen Farhadi

Afsheen Farhadi’s fiction and essays have appeared in various publications, including Colorado Review, The Rumpus, Witness, The Millions, and Vol. 1 Brooklyn.  He is a Ph.D. candidate in the creative writing program at the University of Cincinnati. You can find him on Twitter... Read More →
RL

Rachel Levy

Rachel Levy is the author of A Book So Red and the recipient of a 2018 National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Prose. Her short fiction has appeared in Atticus Review, Black Warrior Review, Fence, Tarpaulin Sky, Western Humanities Review and other journals. She holds a PhD from... Read More →
MS

Michael Shou-Yung Shum

Michael Shou-Yung Shum is an author and educator living in Queens, New York. His first novel, Queen of Spades, was released in 2017 by Forest Avenue Press.
JW

Jaclyn Watterson

Jaclyn Watterson holds a PhD in Literature and Creative Writing from the University of Utah. Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in New Delta Review, The Spectacle, Your Impossible Voice, The Collagist, and Puerto del Sol, among others. Her first book, Ventriloquisms, won the... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
138 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Facing the Other: Fiction, Theology, Ethics
Facing the Other: Fiction, theology, ethics.
What is our responsibility to the other? This is likely THE question of our time. How can we face, respond to, speak to, touch the other while respecting its boundaries, its being, its otherness? How can we face the other without trying to make it the same?
This panel believes that writing is one of the most vital and serious ways of ethically approaching the other. Hilary Plum frames this belief in terms of the connections created by private experience and larger shared histories. Her thinking and writing questions the efficacy of emotion that comes from these connections/collisions. Joseph Cardinale focuses on the narrative mode of parable. For Cardinale, parable is too often seen as didactic, as moving toward clarity and easily understood moral lessons. He wants to rethink parable as a genre that transcends didacticism, guiding the reader not toward clarity, but toward a universalizing spiritual apprehension of mystery and un-knowing. Jeffrey DeShell takers seriously the points of coincidence between theology and fiction, as both can be read as language freed toward an unknown and unknowable other. Noy Holland will work within the spaces and interstices between the natural and spiritual realms.

Presentations will include a short theoretical discussion, followed by a reading from the participants’ own writing. Jeffrey DeShell will serve as moderator.

Moderators
JD

Jeffrey DeShell

Jeffrey DeShell is the author of six novels, mostly recent Expectation (2013) and Arthouse (2011), and a critical book, The Peculiarity of Literature: An Allegorical Approach to Poe’s Fiction. He has co-edited two collections of fiction by American women, Chick-Lit I: Postfeminist... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Cardinale

Joseph Cardinale

Adjunct Instructor, Suffolk Community College
Joseph Cardinale is the author of The Size of the Universe (FC2). His fiction has recently appeared in The Collagist, jubilat, and Denver Quarterly. He is an adjunct instructor of writing at Suffolk Community College on Long Island.
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Noy Holland

Noy Holland is the recipient of the 2018 Katherine Anne Porter Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Her latest book, I Was Trying to Describe What It Feels Like, New and Selected Stories, was published by Counterpoint in January 2017. Her novel, Bird (Counterpoint... Read More →
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Hilary Plum

Hilary Plum is the author of the novel Strawberry Fields, winner of the Fence Modern Prize in Prose (2018); the work of nonfiction Watchfires (2016), winner of the 2018 GLCA New Writers Award for Creative Nonfiction; and the novel They Dragged Them Through the Streets (2013). She... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
117 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Heroes and Collective Resistance
This panel will spark a discussion about the idea of the hero as a collective rather than an individualized role. We´ll do so by opening a dialogue on collective and communal protagonists working for good. These include contemporary narratives in cross-genre, fiction, poetry, speculative poetry as resistance, graphic novel, television shows, etc. We want to bring our thoughts about hero collectives in existing media and our experiences as community activists and teachers to bear on a fruitful discussion about what it means to be together working for a common good. What traits and conditions seem emblematic of collective heroes in media? Why do these matter? How might these inspire us-ness in real life? Our panel includes Ching-In Chen (Sam Houston State University), Addie Tsai (Houston Community College), Soham Patel (The University of Georgia, Athens), MG Roberts (Kelsey Street Press), and Cynthia Arrieu-King (Stockton University).

Speakers
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Cynthia Arrieu-King

Stockton University
A former Kundiman fellow, Cynthia Arrieu-King is the author of People are Tiny in Paintings of China (Octopus 2010), Manifest, (Switchback Books 2013). She edited the Asian Anglophone edition of dusie magazine and the posthumous collection of poetry The Soluble Hour by Hillary Gravendyk... Read More →
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

University of Washington Bothell
Ching-In Chen is author of The Heart's Traffic: a novel in poems (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009), recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017; 2018 Lambda Literary Award Winner for Transgender Poetry); and to make black paper sing (speCt! Books, 2019). Chen is also co-editor of The Revolution... Read More →
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Soham Patel

University of Georgia, Athens
Soham Patel is a Kundiman fellow and an assistant editor at Fence and The Georgia Review. Her chapbooks include and nevermind the storm (Portable Press @ Yo-Yo Labs, 2013) New Weather Drafts (Portable Press @ Yo-Yo Labs, 2016), and in airplane and other poems (oxeye, 2018). She is... Read More →
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Mg Roberts

Kelsey Street Press
Mg Roberts is a multimedia artist, poet, and teacher. She is the author of the poetry collections Anemal Uter Meck (Black Radish Books, 2017) and not so, sea (Durga Press, 2014). Her work has appeared in Dusie, Bombay Gin, Web Conjunctions, Elderly and elsewhere. Currently she is... Read More →
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Addie Tsai

Houston Community College
Addie Tsai teaches courses in literature, creative writing, and humanities at Houston Community College. She collaborated with Dominic Walsh Dance Theater on Victor Frankenstein and Camille Claudel, among others. Addie received her MFA from Warren Wilson College, and she has a PhD... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
102 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Me, Myself, and Eye: A Reading and Discussion of Messy Memoir Boundaries
This panel explores literary practices that are a blend of autobiography and analysis complicated by observations that challenge bodily experience. How does intellection change the purity of the past? How does body/mind entwinement question the very nature of editing? 
What would it mean to animate a creative/critical poetics subtended by somatic attunement? Four writers will explore these questions through the exploration and performance of critical memoir writing that challenges traditional generic boundaries between the personal and the critical. Creative/critical poetics, here, becomes a useful mechanism for moving between the idiosyncratic and the systemic, bringing into public view individual experiences that, however particular, can be understood as reflective of more collective encounters. By moving between, through, alongside, and beyond traditional genres, these acts of personal storytelling offer the possibility of glimpsing what’s at stake in public culture. For us, the imbrication of creative, personal, poetic reflection, with broader, critical, structural interventions makes possible the kind of organic vitalism which can shift cultural geometries of attention, and bring precarious memories and bodies into view. We will relate: the curated space of the vagina to gentrification; blondeness to conditions of personhood; extractive mining in Peru to fatherhood; and domestic violence to daily aesthetic façade.

Speakers
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Whitney DeVos

University of California, Santa Cruz
Whitney DeVos is a PhD candidate in Literature at UC Santa Cruz, with a creative\critical concentration, where she studies post-1945 experimental poetics in the Americas. She is the author of a chapbook, On Being Blonde, and has published creative work in Whiskey Island, lo-ball... Read More →
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Cathy Thomas

University of California, Santa Cruz
Cathy Thomas is a UC President's Dissertation Year Fellow at UC Santa Cruz examining carnivalesque in Caribbean literature with her spec fiction novel Poco Mas. She has worked for NBC, CBS, Warner Bros. and in film development for Forest Whitaker. She is a script reader for Annapurna... Read More →
avatar for Jose Antonio Villarán

Jose Antonio Villarán

University of California, Santa Cruz
Jose Antonio Villarán is the author of la distancia es siempre la misma (Matalamanga, 2006) and el cerrajero / the locksmith (Album del Universo Bakterial, 2012). In 2008 he created the AMLT project (http://amlt-elcomienzo.blogspot.com), an exploration of hypertext literature and... Read More →
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Kirstin Wagner

University of California, Santa Cruz
Kirstin Wagner is a writer and teacher living in Santa Cruz, CA. Her creative work is published/forthcoming in Genealogy, Bombay Gin Literary Journal, Gesture Literary Journal, and Something on Paper. She has taught creative writing at Naropa University, Indiana University, UC-Santa... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
125 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Mixed Panel 5
Michael Barrett, "Poetry and Entropy: A Language Act"
This “language act.” will be informative, performative, stochastic and attempt to enact the material under examination. In _Steps to an Ecology of Mind_, Gregory Bateson uses a gnostic division of the universe to discuss two ways of approaching information: the pleroma and the creatura, “The pleroma is the world in which events are caused by forces and impacts and in which there are no ‘ distinctions.’…In the creatura, effects are brought about precisely by difference” (462). I use Bateson’s division to analyze poetry’s relationship to entropy in both these realms. In the pleroma, entropy is a consequence of the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Poetry engages time’s arrow as subject matter, “Oh Death in Life, the days that are no more,” as well as a way to store negative entropy, “So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, so long lives this…” Christina Bök’s _The Xenotext_ will provide the transition from the pleroma to the creatura. The Xenotext purports to be a heroic attempt to stave off time’s arrow, “A poem stored in the genome of such a resilient bacterium might outlive every civilization, persisting on the planet until the very last dawn, when our star finally explodes” (151). Bök’s project depends on message coding which brings us to the creatura, the realm in which “differences which make a difference” reign, that is, the realm of Claude Shannon’s entropy. In the creatura, entropy is the measurement of a code’s randomness or uncertainty. With Shannon’s definition of entropy, the function of opaque, discursive poetry can be formalized (and even quantified). I’ll be sketching out the procedures for such formalization in the second half of the presentation.

Mark Tardi, "Psychoacoustics "
In my work, I prefer to consider how fundamental mathematical ideas offer not just formal mechanisms but innovative, complex and varied emotional registers. Using the work of famed geometer H.S.M. Coxeter as a guide, I’m trying to consider my own poetic redrawing of multi-dimensional space within a two-dimensional plane, though not, strictly speaking, limiting myself only to icosahedra (like Coxeter did). Some elements are more vigorously focused on the pictorial plane, and other elements are purely textual, conflating interior and exterior spaces and relationships. The aim of my presentation is to offer a visual and auditory performance and discussion of the work, which includes those who attend as performers (as well as myself). Part of the challenge with some of the “poem sculptures,” as Andrew David King has called them, is explicitly in how to read them aloud in comparison to their visual representations. Moreover, the sequencing between compositions could be fluid, dependent on how participants wish to arrange (or re- arrange) various compositions or orders. In addition to considering the formal relationships across the boundaries of poetry or math, art or text, this work has been equally informed by the fact of my living and working in the desert of central Oman for four years: an environment where the pulse of geological time is harshly indifferent to human life –– the physical and mental demands of such a place –– has played a significant part in the renderings and poetic palette.

Michael Workman, "Active Investigations "
I propose to present a brief number of constructed social interactions, each based on written instructions. They may include re-enactments of previous choreographies, or those that address recent investigations of mine into place identity, with specific concerns related to questions of unceded indian land, subsequent local place identity formation, and the social inclusions and exclusions of the resulting communities.

Speakers
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Michael Barrett

Moberly Area Community College
Michael Barrett has a B.A. in Economics from the University of Notre Dame, and a Ph.D. in Creative Writing from University of Illinois at Chicago. As a member of the Chicago Poetry Ensemble, he helped establish the poetry slam before moving on to more esoteric pursuits. He has written... Read More →
avatar for Mark Tardi

Mark Tardi

Senior Lecturer, University of Lodz
Mark Tardi is originally from Chicago and he earned his MFA from Brown University. His publications include the books The Circus of Trust, out from Dalkey Archive Press in 2017, Airport music, and Euclid Shudders. He guest-edited an issue of the literary journal Aufgabe devoted to... Read More →
avatar for Michael Workman

Michael Workman

Chicago Tribune, Guardian US
Michael Workman is an artist, writer and reporter, choreographer, dance, performance art and sociocultural critic. In addition to his work at the Chicago Tribune, Guardian US, Newcity magazine, WBEZ Chicago Public Radio, and as the Movement Matters columnist at Art Intercepts, Workman... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
140 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Mixed Panel 7
Zack Brown, "Making It New: The Mythic Avant-Garde and the Reparative Turn "
In light of recent debates/discussions about the relationship between the Avant-Garde and Myth (especially Myth as dialectically opposed to History and/or Institutional Critique), I propose a scholarly paper that attempts to theorize a “Mythic Avant-Garde” as a legitimate site of socio-political resistance for an increasing number of poets and makers working today. If an overwhelming majority of historical theorizations of the Avant-Garde have been inflected with a thoroughgoing Marxism, and thus with a self-conception in terms of dialectical history, then there has traditionally been little space in innovative writing circles for work that imagines or engages the possibility of a historical otherwise. As our increasingly precarious everyday lives call more and more for reparative literary practices, and as the dialectical terms of Avant-Garde Innovation are increasingly co-opted by the Capitalist enterprises of Silicon Valley, the need for radically new theorizations of the Avant-Garde becomes particularly pressing. Through the work of Sophia Le Fraga, Divya Victor, and Chris Sylvester, I will attempt to locate one possible conception of the Mythic Avant-Garde in what I call each writers’ “critique of Conceptualism from within Conceptualism.” Disavowing the Marxist predilections of Conceptual Writing’s old guard, I find in each writer’s work a rearticulation of Conceptual strategies for a Post-Conceptual Avant-Garde that opens (rather than closes) the terms of our futural histories, an otherwise that mythically steps outside the binaristic dialectical progression of the historical Avant-Garde as such.

Kathleen Naughton, Feeling Thinking: Reparative Reading and Maggie Nelson's "Argonauts"
Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts, both in its content and in its form, works to expand the possibilities of criticism and our understanding and articulation of what criticism is and does. The concept of “reparative reading,” which comes out of queer theorist Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s work, can be used to articulate the expanded field of criticism in Nelson’s work. Applying psychoanalyst Melanie Klein’s work on paranoid and reparative psychological positions, Sedgwick argues that most contemporary criticism takes paranoia and suspicion as a requirement of critical practice and calls on critics to imagine critical possibilities that work differently. The Argonauts can be seen as an example of an alternative, perhaps reparative criticism. Nelson’s use of a fragmented and notational form allows her to establish “weak” or “local” theories that preserve context rather than obscuring these moments of partial or specific realization under the aegis of a strong paranoid theory or overarching narrative. This formal move is itself theorized by Nelson’s text, which questions the ways in which language and interpretation might be sufficient, and in what ways they fail. If earlier examples of reparative critical practice have often worked by putting life and theory into relationship and have focused on the relationship of critic to artwork, The Argonauts adds an element of uncertainty to the reparative equation about articulation of either life or theory and further expands our understanding of the possibilities of “weak theory” from the perspective not only of critics, but also of artists.

Yuriy Tarnawsky, "Literary Yoga". Eckhard Gerdes, editor and publisher of JEF Books, will host an event in conjunction with the official book release of Yuriy Tarnawsky's collection of literary exercises entitled "Literary Yoga." Tarnawsky will lead participants through a series of fun but challenging exercises designed to stretch particpants' literary muscles.  Struggling with iambs and pentameters? Characters and plots? Has one hit the concrete wall of a writer’s block? Or is one having the time of one's life seeing the pen trace out graceful meanders of words on the blank pages before fleet fingers make letters dutifully jump off the keyboard onto the screen above it? Whichever is the case, participants will be invited to participate in a few of the 100 exercises the artist and educator in Yuriy Tarnawsky have conjured up for you. What the gentle stretching on the yoga mat does for the muscles and joints, these painful tasks will do for the writing talents inside the writer. Writers may return to them again, and again, and again.

Speakers
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Zack Brown

Zack Brown (SUNY Buffalo)
Zack Brown lives and works in Buffalo, New York, where he is pursuing a PhD in English. As a member of SUNY Buffalo's Poetics Program, he studies Modern and Contemporary poetry and poetics, materiality studies and digital humanities, and theories of the avant-garde. In addition to... Read More →
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Kathleen Naughton

University at Buffalo (SUNY)
Katie Naughton is a doctoral student in the Poetics program at the University at Buffalo (SUNY). She holds an MFA from Colorado State University and her poetry has been published by flag + void, jubilat, and Lambda Literary's Poetry Spotlight.
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Yuriy Tarnawsky

Yuriy Tarnawsky has authored some three dozen books of poetry, fiction, drama, essays, and translations in English and Ukrainian, including the novels Meningitis and Three Blondes and Death, the collections of short stories Short Tails and Crocodile Smiles, three collections of mininovels... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
129 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Open Wounds: Eros in Contemporary Feminist Poetics
This panel will explore a feminist poetics that articulates pleasure, desire, and dynamic attachment in response to the psychic and bodily wounds imposed by patriarchal violence. Given that this violence is often aimed at the body’s capacity for pleasure and desire, we will look at work that explores eros, vulnerability, and relationality to mark these wounds rather than conceal or heal them, to, as Rosi Braidotti has said, explore desire as fundamental in the “feminist politics of pursuing alternative definitions of female subjectivity.” In addition to looking at ways certain works of prose, poetry, and cross-genre work in translation aim to trouble liberal virtues of individualism, self-interest, and what Judith Butler has called “the masculinist fantasies of sovereign mastery,” we will ask larger questions like, what are different ways to articulate the “female” body, what is the “female” body, and how to perform the body in all of its various particularities, its languaged, cultural, and social iterations. With the aim of challenging hierarchical arrangements of public/private, self/other, production/reproduction, and pleasure/pain, we hope to explore virtues of eros playing a primary role in meaning-making, subject-formation, and the making of the poem and social/poetic self.

Speakers
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Alexis Almeida

Alexis Almeida lives in Providence and teaches in Bard College's Language and Thinking Program. Her long poem, I Have Never Been Able to Sing, forthcoming from Ugly Ducking Presse, and her translation of Roberta Iannamico's Wreckage is just out from Toad Press.
avatar for Mary-Kim Arnold

Mary-Kim Arnold

Visiting Lecturer, Brown University
Mary-Kim Arnold’s Litany for the Long Moment (Essay Press, 2018), an experimental memoir about her adoption from Korea at the age of two, has been honored by the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association, featured in NPR’s Code Switch 2018 Book Guide, and named by Entropy... Read More →
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Julie Carr

Julie Carr is an associate professor at the University of Colorado. With Tim Roberts, she co-edits Counterpath Press. Objects from a Borrowed Confession is just out from Ahsahta, and Real Life: An Installation is forthcoming from Omnidawn.
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Carolina Ebeid

University of Denver
Carolina Ebeid is a PhD candidate in the University of Denver's creative writing program, where she serves as Associate Editor of the Denver Quarterly. She has won fellowships from CantoMundo, the Stadler Center for Poetry, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Her first book... Read More →
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Aditi Machado

Aditi Machado is an Indian poet, translator, and editor of translation. Her books are Some Beheadings (Nightboat, 2017) and a translation, from the French, of Farid Tali’s Prosopopoeia (Action, 2016).  She is the poetry editor for a journal of translation called Asymptote and the... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
131 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Performative: Between poetry, performance, and critique
The concept of an impossible theater has recently been codified in a unique anthology, Imagined Theaters: Writing for a Theoretical Stage (Routledge, 2017). For this volume dozens of writers contributed short works of imagined theater and brief commentary on their own or other’s contributions to the anthology; the writer was thus invited to both envision and critique works for theater that in one way or another exceed the boundaries of theater. These are works that, for instance, “stretch the duration of an event to last a lifetime or to outlive many generations” or produce “great accumulations [that] fill the page with a density that exceeds the carrying capacity of theater.” In general, the texts of such “theater” shift the attention away from theatrical production and dramatic illustration to concepts and the event of writing. This concept of an imagined (or imaginary or impossible) theater is the point of departure for our project, one that we see as a contribution to feminist and queer poetics and poets’ theater. Our cross-generational group of poets wish to amplify the concept of the impossible performance text as collaborative event that investigates non-binary thinking (and modes of being), multi-authorship, and the “impossible” as a medium of poetry. Our text will develop from an exchange of short works of “impossible poetics theater,” such that we are responding multiple times to works that are passed from one collaborator to another: our responses to the received texts can occur as discursive reflection or as creative text. Thus, the group seeks to collapse, embellish, and complicate the relationship of creative work to critique. Our presentation will be an edited version of our combined text, presented in ebullient and edgy dialogue. It will take place in a roundtable format with a series of exchanges amongst the performers.

Speakers
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Mel Elberg

Mel Elberg is a queer poet and artist interested in speculative, intersectional feminisms and in the effect of writing on our experience of time.
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Carla Harryman

Eastern Michigan University
Carla Harryman is the author of 20 books of experimental poetry, prose, and performance writing. Her Poets Theater plays, bilingual, and text-based scores have been performed nationally and internationally. Recent publications include Sue in Berlin (2018), a collection of performance... Read More →
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Rachel Levitsky

RACHEL LEVITSKY has published three book length collections, Under the Sun (Futurepoem, 2003), NEIGHBOR (UDP, 2009) and the poetic novella, The Story of My Accident is Ours (Futurepoem, 2013) and is author of nine chapbooks, most recently, Hopefully, The Island, part of an ongoing... Read More →
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Deborah Meadows

Deborah Meadows is the author of numerous books of poetry and lives with her husband in Los Angeles’ Arts District. Her published plays have had performances and staged readings. Her recent book titled Lecture Notes: A duration poem in twelve parts is derived from public lectures... Read More →
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Megan Stockton

Megan Stockton is a poet and publisher living in Detroit, Michigan. She is a member of Problem Press, the previous editor-in-chief of BathHouse Journal, and editor at Weekday Journal. Her writing has been published by Publication Studio, Monster House Press, BigBig Wednesday, Bearings... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
136 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Undergraduates Under Experimentation
We are proposing a reading of the work that the undergraduate students of Chapman in Orange California have been doing in the realm of avant-garde literature. A small number of Chapman students have found their voices in experimental literature, they have found the ability to freely explore themes of isolation, intimacy, and relationships, having to do with the rise of technological use in the digital age. Chapman students are seeking a new way to explore life around them through experimental literature. They haven’t been able to find to find a voice in the digital age they relate to, so they are creating their own work. We will each read short samples of our work, splitting up the time between us, as well as leaving time for a Q&A at the end.

Speakers
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Caitlyn Cook

Caitlyn Cook is finishing up her B.F.A. in Creative Writing at Chapman University and is editor-in-chief of The Underground Experimental Zine. She writes horror, experimental, and various forms of poetry. She enjoys the challenge of writing with constraints and creative forms. Talk... Read More →
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Matt Garcia

Matt Garcia is a writer, music composer, and makeshift father to two cats with all the grace and charm of a brick. He loves them anyway. Finding the interplay of music and writing intriguing, he enjoys integrating the forms to discover new modes of poetry and lyricism.
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Kenna Maedel

Kenna Maedel has been writing for most of her life and always had a great passion for literary work. She loves to write about romance, feminism, and family. Her background in theatre has also inspired her emotional prose. She is currently working on getting her undergraduate degree... Read More →
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Meriel O'Connell

Meriel O’Connell is a senior at Chapman University, having transferred from the University of Oregon in further pursuit of writing. After attending the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference, based in Ripton, Vermont, for the past three years, &NOW is the second writing conference she... Read More →
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Kyle Rosin

Kyle Rosin, after spending 11 years growing up in the sprawling city of Detroit Michigan, I spent most of my developing life in the beautiful Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Always having a draw to nature, I feel that it is my home of Aspen where I was able to develop my writing through... Read More →
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Hailey Shannon

Hailey Shannon is a senior at Chapman University perusing her BFA in Creative Writing. Over the last year, she has found her voice in experimental literature thanks to professors like Dr. Martin Nakell and Rebecca Goodman. She enjoys writing and filmmaking. Of late she is fascinated... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am EDT
116 DeBartolo Hall

9:00am EDT

Book Sale
Sunday October 7, 2018 9:00am - 1:30pm EDT
108 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

Fictional Hybridity: Intersections with Theory, Genre, and Technology
According to Derrida, "the motif of homogeneity, the theological motif par excellence, is decidedly the one to be destroyed." Otherwise stated, homogeneity need not be destroyed because (textual) homogeneity does not exist. This reading and Q&A features four prose writers whose work interrogates the concepts of hybridity and unity. As early as Don Quixote, novels have been critiqued for their perceived heterogeneity, lack of proportion, or the incorporation of extraneous material. Yet what would would a "pure" text, free from mixture, look like? How much may a novel absorb, for example, from poetry, nonfiction, the visual arts, or the Internet before it ceases to be a novel? These are just a few of the issues and questions that will be taken up by the reading and discussion to follow.

Speakers
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Jessica Berger

Jessica Berger is a Chicago-based fiction writer as well as an editor with Grimoire and Always Crashing Magazine. Her work has been featured in Ninth Letter, Pank, Barrelhouse, trnsfr, Gamut, The Spectacle, Maudlin House, Moonsick, Midwestern Gothic, and elsewhere.
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Dan Magers

Dan Magers’s first book of poems, Partyknife, (Birds, LLC) was described by Thurston Moore “as if poet-ghost adrift thru dressing rooms backstage taking notes…Writing poems like these is just as good as starting a band.” His newest poetry chapbook Spiritual Grave Year is published... Read More →
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Brooks Sterritt

Brooks Sterritt’s writing appears in The New Republic, Subtropics, Vice, and The Believer. He recently completed a novel exploring the novel-film relation.
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Brooke Wonders

Assistant Professor of Languages & Literatures, University of Northern Iowa


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:35am - 11:50am EDT
131 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

Mixed Panel 13
Martin Nakell, "How to Survive a Bombing Raid in Syria, 2018"
A three-layered multi-media presentation, involving, simultaneously, a previously recorded reading of my poem, "How to Survive a Bombing Raid in Syria, 2018," an original musical composition, and images projected on a screen from the war. I will only introduce the piece. No one will be at the podium, leaving no barrier between the elements of this piece and the audience. The piece runs about 25 minutes. A Chapman graduate student, Tyler Hardy, is composing the music, a haunting and beautiful piece. The images are from news photographers. Given its importance, I would like to show this piece at a gathering of the whole conference. I hope to generate a conversation on just what we mean by "now" and why "it's needed." i would prefer that discussion to take place informally. i.e., I would prefer not to take questions, as what I have to say the art speaks for. While it talks specifically about Syria, I mean this piece to signify war in general, and our human spirit, so enigmatically capable of both war and tenderness.

Yuriy Tarnawsky, "Homage to Stephen Hawking"
I will read the poem "Stephen Hawking Goes Flying" written in 2015 and published in the 2015 Jaded Ibis Press anthology "Devouring the Green," which anticipated his passing. The reading will be 20 minutes long. I have not been able to organize a full-length session and would like to be included in an existing one.

Tyler Hardy contributing participant to this panel.

M.D. Coverley, Pacific Surfliner – San Juan Capistrano
San Juan Capistrano is one in a series of videos that comprise the Pacific Surfliner project.  The videos map the route of the Pacific Surfliner train along the California coast from San Diego to San Luis Obispo.  These works trace a story in stations – tales of a certain generation in time.  The passing windows reveal arrivals and departures over the years, loss and joy. A lifetime in fleeting impressions.
While San Juan Capistrano has some elements of overview, touching on many life transformations, each piece draws on events, both fictional and autobiographical, associated with the location.  The vagaries of recollection suffuse the landscape and haunt the gaps.
The individual videos are layered with images, sound, and text. The casual viewer may experience a quick evocation – the more persistent reader can explore the detail.
This performance will include some background explanation and a showing/reading of San Juan Capistrano.

Pacific Surfliner continues my experiments with narrative structure - the layering of time and space, the merging of history with private events, the juxtaposition of place and memory.  The temporal gaps and the imaginative space of the in-between invite the reader to enter into the visual space and complete the world. But it also involves some new directions and experiments with storytelling modes, some specific aesthetic and technical issues.  

Speakers
avatar for M.D. Coverley

M.D. Coverley

Board Member, Electronic Literature Organization
Marjorie Coverley Luesebrink writes hypermedia fiction as M.D. Coverley. Her full-length interactive, electronic novel, Califia, is available on CD-ROM from Eastgate Systems. Egypt: The Book of Going Forth by Day was published in 2006.  Coverley's Web short stories and essays have... Read More →
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Martin Nakell

Chapman University
Winner of a Gertrude Stein Award in Poetry, Martin Nakell has published The Myth of Creation (poetry, Parentheses Writing), Ramon (fiction, Jawbone Press/The National Endowment for the Arts), The Library of Thomas Rivka (fiction, Sun & Moon), Two Fields that Face & Mirror Each Other... Read More →
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Yuriy Tarnawsky

Yuriy Tarnawsky has authored some three dozen books of poetry, fiction, drama, essays, and translations in English and Ukrainian, including the novels Meningitis and Three Blondes and Death, the collections of short stories Short Tails and Crocodile Smiles, three collections of mininovels... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:35am - 11:50am EDT
129 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

Mixed Panel 8
Kanika Agrawal, "Okazaki Fragments and the Poetics of (Dis)Continuity"
_Okazaki Fragments_, a manuscript in progress, is a science-fictional romance in prose, verse and graphics. It explores human and non-human varieties of relation and performance by adapting language, concepts and images from a series of sixteen scientific papers published between 1968 and 1977. The series, _Mechanism of DNA Chain Growth_, presents research on discontinuous DNA replication by the molecular biologists Reiji Okazaki and Tsuneko Okazaki and their scientific collaborators. Because very little biographical information about the Okazakis is available in English, I construct imagined events and experiences for Okazaki and Okazaki by reading their personal lives into (or out of) the scientific language of their papers. (I draw imagery also from various Japanese sources, particularly the works of photographer Nobuyoshi Araki, artist Katsushika Hokusai, and filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu, and from the grid prints and paintings of Agnes Martin.) In a rare, recent “personal recollection” of the Okazakis’ famous discovery, Tsuneko writes that “[her] research career overlaps with the history of Molecular Biology.” I extend her statement to consider how the Okazakis’ activities and relationships might not only overlap with the history of molecular biology but be legible in experiments that define some of that history. For my presentation, I propose to briefly explain discontinuous DNA replication, read from _Okazaki Fragments_, and show/perform some of the images adapted from the scientific papers.

Wojciech Drag, "The Art of/in Crisis: Collage in Twenty-First-Century Literature"
David Banash notes that collage is frequently evoked in contemporary literature as a metaphor for the “experience of a radically fragmented world.” The perception of a collage is similar to that of a disorienting reality marked by the dynamic flow of news, messages and consumer stimuli. Among the most important American practioners of collage – understood as a montage of fragmentary, heterogeneous material including appropriated content – have been David Markson, Maggie Nelson, Lance Olsen, David Shields and Steve Tomasula. Their works are informed by two contradictory desires which Banash sees as the quintessence of all collage: the critique embodied in the process of cutting and the nostalgia that underlies the act of gathering and pasting. The coexistence of progressive protest and a conservative longing for a whole, together with the incorporation of multiple voices, results in an inner disunity. Following Thomas L. Brockelman’s remark that collage is an art “in” as well as “of” crisis, I argue that crisis is a key notion to the form as well as content of twenty-first-century collage literature. In my paper, I will introduce my current research project (supported by the Kosciuszko Foundation) whose aims are to examine the poetics and politics of collage and to demonstrate that contemporary American literary collages can be interpreted as testimonies to the crises afflicting the new millennium, personal, sociopolitical and artistic. I will then focus on examining the crises represented in Steve Tomasula’s VAS: An Opera in Flatland and Olsen’s Head in Flames.

Scott Rettberg, "Histories and Genres of Electronic Literature"
This will be a 15-20 minute presentation of the book Electronic Literature, forthcoming from Polity in November 2018. The presentation will focus on connections between experimental traditions in print and forms of electronic literature such as poetry generators and hypertext fiction. It will consider the place of electronic literature in the landscape of contemporary creative writing programs and will include a reading of some short passages from the book. About the book: Electronic Literature considers new forms and genres of writing that exploit the capabilities of computers and networks – literature that would not be possible without the contemporary digital context.In this book, Rettberg places the most significant genres of electronic literature in historical, technological, and cultural contexts. These include hypertext fiction, combinatory poetics, interactive fiction (and other game-based digital literary work), kinetic and interactive poetry, and networked writing based on our collective experience of the Internet. Rettberg argues that electronic literature demands to be read both through the lens of experimental literary practices dating back to the early twentieth century and through the specificities of the technology and software used to produce the work. “Electronic Literature demonstrates rare common sense and an encyclopedic knowledge of works, theory, contexts, and criticism. This is a significant and important book by the field’s founder that will be the definitive work on electronic literature now and for many years to come.” --Katherine Hayles, Duke University

Speakers
KA

Kanika Agrawal

Kanika Agrawal is an Indian citizen and hybrid specimen developed across six countries on four continents. She studied biology at MIT, where she came to love restriction enzymes and fluorescent labeling. She earned an MFA in Writing from Columbia University and a PhD in English/Creative... Read More →
avatar for Wojciech Drąg

Wojciech Drąg

University of Wroclaw
Wojciech Drag is Assistant Professor at the University of Wroclaw in Poland. He is the author of Revisiting Loss: Memory, Trauma and Nostalgia in the Novels of Kazuo Ishiguro (2014) and co-editor of War and Words: Representations of Military Conflict in Literature and the Media (2015... Read More →
SR

Scott Rettberg

University of Bergen
Scott Rettberg is Professor of Digital Culture in the department of linguistic, literary, and aesthetic studies at the University of Bergen, Norway. Rettberg is the author or coauthor of novel-length works of electronic literature, combinatory poetry, and films including The Unknown... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:35am - 11:50am EDT
140 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

Topside/Underworld: an open conversation on making art at the edge of the abyss through which crisis has asked you walk
In our late-stage capitalist, late-anthropocene, or what Naropa is calling the captialocene, moment, we’re fielding all manner of unmaking. Where personal loss and trauma have begun to collude with collective loss and trauma, it has become difficult to tell whether our heads are above or underwater, whether we walk on the grass or under the grass. In an ailing culture that manipulates its people by insisting they become immune to affect, to the intensities that inform their bodies as ideology and affect intersect producing emotion, how do we still make art? How do we make do? What do we do? Do we, as CA Conrad suggests, surrender hope so that something more vital may take its place? Do we as Lauren Berlant suggests break into the hymn hum taking place between planes of cruel optimism? Do we, as John Keene does in
Counternaratives defy “progressive history” and master narratives, suggesting possible ways that art might respond to capitalism’s effects. How do we, Sarah Ahmed’s, melancholy subjects unhook our happy objects and form the chorus that doesn’t hurt so bad? Were you in the abyss? When you got back, was there no welcome, but a pile of bills, the to-do list grown exponential, your friends scattered and your family regarded you with suspicion? Yes, us, too. Please bring something you wrote from its edges or an exercise that helped you get from one end of the day to the other or a thought about collectivity that even when depleted, even when susceptible to one’s government, culture, economy, and more painful forms of embodiment, one can still pursue.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Cooperman

Matthew Cooperman

Professor of English, Colorado State University
Matthew Cooperman is the author of, most recently, NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified), w/Aby Kaupang, (Futurepoem, 2018), as well as Spool, winner of the New Measure Prize (Free Verse Editions, 2016), Disorder 299.00, w/Aby Kaupang, (Essay Press 2016), the text + image collaboration... Read More →
avatar for Aby Kaupang

Aby Kaupang

Aby Kaupang, author of Little “g” God Grows Tired of Me (SpringGun Press, 2013), Absence is Such a Transparent House (Tebot Bach, 2011) and Scenic Fences | Houses Innumerable (Scantily Clad Press, 2008), has had poems appear in FENCE, La Petite Zine, Dusie, Verse, Denver Quarterly... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Pafunda

Danielle Pafunda

Assistant Professor of English, University of Maine
Danielle Pafunda is author of nine books including the recent Beshrew (Dusie Press) and The Dead Girls Speak in Unison (Bloof Books), and the forthcoming The Book of Scab (Ricochet Editions) and Spite (Ahsahta Press 2020, Sawtooth finalist). She has taught at the University of Wyoming... Read More →
avatar for Katie Jean Shinkle

Katie Jean Shinkle

Assistant Professor of English, Central State University
Katie Jean Shinkle is the author of three books, most recently Ruination(Spuyten Duyvil, 2018). Other prose, poetry, and criticisms can be found in Flaunt Magazine, The Georgia Review, Denver Quarterly, The Collagist, New South, Washington Square Review, and elsewhere. She serves... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:35am - 11:50am EDT
113 DeBartolo

10:35am EDT

Transgressive Circulation
In this panel we will discuss translation's transgressive circulation. Instead of focusing on the old binary of free-vs-faithful translation, we will talk about what happens when we translate: What happens to the poem, the poet, the translator and the various contexts that the translation sets in motion. Rather than fearing or neutralizing the volatility and uncertainty of translation, we'll celebrate translation's capacity for resisting assimilation and altering US literary culture's conception of itself, revealing it to be contradictory, various, and plural. Translation reveals a US poetry made of myriad of movements, permutations and contact zones, a poetry of queer and contested borders. Translation alters the power dynamics of publishing, scholarship and readership and reveals the imperial language of English itself to be strange, corrupted, mutant and excessive.

Speakers
JG

Johannes Göransson

University of Notre Dame
Johannes Göransson (b. 1973) is the author of eight books, including The Sugar Book, the memoir POETRY AGAINST ALL (forthcoming) and a critical book about translation, Transgressive Circulation (forthcoming). He has translated a number of books, including works by Kim Yideum, Aase... Read More →
CH

Christian Hawkey

Christian Hawkey has written two full-length poetry collections , four chapbooks, and the cross-genre book Ventrakl (2010), Ugly Duckling Presse, about translating Georg Trakl. He is a member of the decolonial translation collective WeTransist (wetransist.org).
SM

Sade Murphy

Sade Murphy holds an MFA from Pratt Institute and is the author of Dream Machine. She is currently translating contemporary Afro-German poets.


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:35am - 11:50am EDT
136 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

Working Abundancies: Writing in the Margins of the Neoliberal University
As anyone familiar with academic life in America knows, the neo-liberalization of the university system has left graduates of doctoral programs in the liberal arts struggling to find viable academic employment opportunities and thriving peer communities within institutional departments. The loss of traditional academic employment and support, however, has resulted in creative and abundant redefinitions of writing as research, of thought as written form. No longer beholden to the ossified institutional models of academic protocol, writers with academic backgrounds have taken shelter within extra-academic writing communities and are innovating new forms for their scholarly research, taking cues from a rich American history of innovative writing, drawing on, for example, the autobiographical impulses of New Narrative and recent redefinitions of the essay form, as well as the post-war poetics of the New American Poetry. The four writers featured in this reading have radically redefined work that began inside the parameters of the university to reimagine intellectual labor from within the margins and beyond the confines of the institution.

Speakers
JD

Johnny Damm

Johnny Damm is a writer specializing in verbal-visual and creative-critical blends. He is the author of The Science of Things Familiar (The Operating System, 2017) and three chapbooks, including Your Favorite Song (Essay Press, 2016). His work has appeared in Poetry, Denver Quarterly, the... Read More →
LD

Lynne DeSilva-Johnson

Lynne DeSilva-Johnson is an interdisciplinary artist and performer, cultural scholar and educator. They are an Assistant Visiting Professor at Pratt Institute, as well as Founder and Creative Director of The Operating System, a radical open source arts organization and independent... Read More →
MR

Margaret Rhee

Margaret Rhee is the author of chapbooks Yellow (Tinfish Press, 2011), Radio Heart; or, How Robots Fall Out of Love (Finishing Line Press, 2015), nominated for a 2017 Elgin Award, SFPA (Science Fiction Poetry Association), and her full length collection Love, Robot (The Operating... Read More →
avatar for Magdalena Zurawski

Magdalena Zurawski

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia, Athens
Magdalena Zurawski is the author of The Bruise (a novel) and Companion Animal (a poetry collection). In the spring of 2019 Wave Books will published her newest poetry collection The Tiniest Muzzle Sings Songs of Freedom. Currently she is working on a book-length essay on teaching... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:35am - 11:50am EDT
138 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

Mixed Panel 9: "Off the Page: Collaborations in Visual and Sonic Poetry” and "Marginal Transmissions.”
Warren Lehrer and Judith Sloan, "Off the Page: Collaborations in Visual and Sonic Poetry"

Writer/designer/performer Warren Lehrer and poet/actor/audio artist Judith Sloan present and perform excerpts from works of visual and sonic poetry. Projects include: a multimedia symphony for a new America; poetry in (hundreds of) vacant storefront windows; an interactive poem (for a new art+literary app) that takes the reader inside the mind of a stroke victim; a poetry-theater piece with recorded sounds and live musicians about trauma, recovered memories and teaching immigrant and incarcerated youth; animations linked to a memoir in short poems; and documentary radio poems from a project about the most diverse locality in the U.S. The husband and wife co-directors of EarSay discuss working together, alone, and with other collaborators, and their compulsion to present poetry and other text-based projects on and OFF the page. They will also talk about their relationship to communities, especially their home borough of Queens, NY, and the process of presenting their work back into the community—in public venues and media other than books (as much as they adore books). Sloan will perform an excerpt from Yo Miss! a prose poem-theater piece using midi-controllers and an original musical score. Lehrer will share his approach to capturing the shape of thought, giving form to the interior underpinnings of a poem, conjuring experience, and creating participatory reads through typography, and more recently kinetic typography.

Analeah Loschiavo Rosen and S. Yarberry, “Marginal Transmission”
Metaphor diminishes the autonomy of each image. We propose a writing praxis wherein images accrue to create affect and every occurrence on the page is recognized as reality. For instance, instead of assuming other worlds are metaphors for alternate realities let’s assume other worlds exist simultaneous to ours. Accessing these worlds depends on practices of deep-listening and altering our tactics of communication. It is said that we are in dialogue before we are in language, i.e. we experience our world through sensory input, only later “translating” it into recognizable-word-patterns. Therefore, we propose a praxis that gives adequate time and space to this marginal preverbal state, because it is herein that gateways to adjacent dimensions might be found.  In our presentation, we will share our research findings. Having taken extensive audio recordings of high-density areas in the greater St. Louis area and translated these “ambient” noises into English, we have revealed their true poetics. From this process we believe that other planes of existence can be entered, allowing us to glean new poetic forms and even new languages. In our presentation, we will play some of these field recordings and offer simultaneous translation and invite audience to cooperatively translate a field recording in real-time, which we will transcribe for our further study. Additionally, all audience members will receive a newsprint poster of instructions for replicating this process in their own dimension(s).  For this project we are indebted to the works of Renee Gladman’s “Ravicka”, Lenore Malen’s “The New Society for Universal Harmony”, and Eames Demetrios’ “Kcymaerxthaere” project.



Speakers
avatar for Warren Lehrer

Warren Lehrer

Co-Director, EarSay
Warren Lehrer is a writer/designer known as a pioneer of visual literature and design authorship. He has received many awards for his books and multimedia projects including the Brendan Gill Prize, the IPPY Outstanding Book of the Year Award, the Innovative Use of Archives Award... Read More →
avatar for Judith Sloan

Judith Sloan

Co-founder, Artist, Educator, Adjunct Professor Gallatin, NYU, EarSay, Inc.
Judith Sloan is an award-winning writer, audio artist, radio producer and performer. Her new work, YO MISS! is in development with dramaturg Morgan Jenness. She is co-founder with Warren Lehrer of EarSay, a non-profit dedicated to documenting and portraying the lives of uncelebrated... Read More →
SY

S. Yarberry

S. Yarberry is a trans poet and writer. Their poetry has appeared in, or is forthcoming in, Tin House, Indiana Review, The Offing, Berkeley Poetry Review, jubilat, The Washington Post's The Lily Magazine, Notre Dame Review, miscellaneous zines, among others. Their other writings can... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:35am - 11:50am EDT
116 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

"Wars I Have Seen: (Re)Writing American Militarism"
War has always infected American writing, but a new militarism emerging in recent decades challenges poets, novelists, and non-fiction writers to think in innovative ways about the relationship between state violence, consumer culture, and the literary imagination. This panel will discuss how fiction and poetry might address ongoing contemporary wars, often distant, undeclared, covert, and fought by drones, mercenaries, and special forces operators, while recognizing the long history of American militarism and the dubious complicity of much American war literature. Creative and critical responses will focus on questions of form, rhetoric, style, audience, and narrative: How do we write, and rewrite, the story of American war?

Panel format will begin with introductory remarks by Roy Scranton, then creative and critical presentations from participants, approximately 8-10 minutes each, and conclude with a discussion and Q&A with the audience.

Moderators
RS

Roy Scranton

University of Notre Dame
Roy Scranton is the author of WE'RE DOOMED. NOW WHAT?, WAR PORN, and LEARNING TO DIE IN THE ANTHROPOCENE. He is Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Notre Dame.

Speakers
OE

Omar El Akkad

Omar El Akkad is the author of AMERICAN WAR. He is based in Portland, Oregon.
AB

Andrea Brady

Andrea Brady is the author of several books of poetry including THE STRONG ROOM and CUT FROM THE RUSHES, and is currently finishing a monograph on POETRY AND BONDAGE as a fellow of the National Humanities Center. She is Professor of Poetry at Queen Mary University of London.
RH

Rob Halpern

Rob Halpern lives between San Francisco and Ypsilanti, Michigan, where he teaches at Eastern Michigan University and Huron Valley Women’s Prison. His books include Common Place (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2015), Music for Porn (Nightboat Books, 2012), Disaster Suites (Palm Press, 2009... Read More →
HP

Hilary Plum

Hilary Plum is the author of the novel Strawberry Fields, winner of the Fence Modern Prize in Prose (2018); the work of nonfiction Watchfires (2016), winner of the 2018 GLCA New Writers Award for Creative Nonfiction; and the novel They Dragged Them Through the Streets (2013). She... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:35am - 11:50am EDT
117 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

“Writing Across and Beyond: A Conversation on Innovating Narrative Forms”
How might we engage with story material that is multimodal, hypertextual, or experiential in nature? How do we ethically and respectfully transcribe experiences and pasts that resist verbal or textual representation? And -- perhaps most pressing -- how might our engagements with sound archives, oral narratives, and dreamscapes create new possibilities for print forms? In this panel, writers will dialogue about translating and transcribing tarot energies, dreamscapes, and oral histories, exploring how hybridity (fluidly defined) provides a platform for putting such experiences into print. Panelists will offer inventive presentations on their currently developing projects and converse with each other and the audience about process. Projects include remixing multimodal archival material; investigating the logic of dreams; translating, transliterating, and transcribing multilingual/vocal family histories of trauma; and drawing on the energetics of tarot to dive deeper into and defamiliarize autobiographical material. Audiences will leave with a spectrum of approaches and methods for conducting “research” that is slippery and subversive.

Speakers
MK

Mildred K Barya

Assistant Professor of Creative Writing and Literature, University of North Carolina - Ashville
Mildred K Barya is Assistant Professor of creative writing and literature at UNC-Asheville, board member of African Writers Trust (AWT) and has published three poetry books, plus short stories in various journals. She holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Denver & blogs... Read More →
TC

Teresa Carmody

Teresa Carmody is the author of Maison Femme: a fiction and Requiem. Recently published projects include the chapbook “Hide and See” (No Press) and DeLand (Container), a view-master book made in collaboration with fiber artist Madison Creech. Carmody is the Editor Emeritus of... Read More →
LD

Lindsey Drager

Lindsey Drager is the author of the novels The Sorrow Proper (Dzanc, 2015), recipient of the 2016 Binghamton University / John Gardner Fiction Award, and The Lost Daughter Collective (Dzanc, 2017), a finalist for the 2018 Lambda Literary Award in LGBTQ Science Fiction, Fantasy, and... Read More →
TM

Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint

Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint is the author of the lyric novel The End of Peril, the End of Enmity, the End of Strife, A Haven (Noemi Press, 2018) and the forthcoming family history project, Zat Lun, which won the 2018 Graywolf Nonfiction Prize. Her short prose has appeared in the Black Warrior... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:35am - 11:50am EDT
125 DeBartolo Hall

10:35am EDT

Other-animal Time
“Time capital”: digitized, metronomic, post-Fordist, western, Amazon-Primed, punitive, humancentric and white, proceeds toward a horizon of profit and destruction, seemingly unveeringly progressive and inevitable. The myriad ways and possibilities of thinking and interacting within time are occluded by this dominating and domineering phenomenon of time management. How do language practices and philosophies of communication intervene on legislated modes of duration, rhythm, and succession in order to reorient human animals with mutual presences: fauna and flora, and all life forces, decentering the white capitalist human clock/progress/destruction/imperialist/narcissist campaigns of experience. In the era of mass extinction where the losses are exponential, what does it mean to challenge disciplining mechanisms that organize and extinguish life? How can we do time differently, rebuilding in the place of the industrial military prison economy a time economy of reciprocity? How can our role as poets and initiators of language exchange reorient practices that negotiate how we move and breath within timeframes?

Speakers
AC

Aja Couchois Duncan

Aja Couchois Duncan is a Bay Area educator, writer and coach of Ojibwe, French and Scottish descent. Her writing has been anthologized in Biting the Error: Writers Explore Narrative (Coach House Press,) Bay Poetics (Faux Press) and Love Shook My Heart 2 (Alyson Press). Her debut collection... Read More →
BI

Brenda Iijima

Brenda Iijima’s involvements occur at the intersections and mutations of poetry, research movement, animal studies, ecological sociology and submerged histories. She is the author of seven full-length collections of poetry and numerous chapbooks and artist’s books. Her most recent... Read More →
avatar for Jose-Luis Moctezuma

Jose-Luis Moctezuma

Jose-Luis Moctezuma is a Mexican-American poet, translator, instructor, and editor. His poetry and criticism have been published in Jacket2, Chicago Review, Big Bridge, MAKE Magazine, PALABRA, FlashPoint, Cerise Press, and elsewhere. His chapbook, Spring Tlaloc Seance, was published... Read More →
avatar for Connie Voisine

Connie Voisine

Professor, New Mexico State University
Author most recently of "And God Created Women" and "The Bower."


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:35am - 11:50am EDT
102 DeBartolo Hall

12:00pm EDT

Alternate Facts, Fictional Awareness & the Information Wars
This critical-creative panel will consider recent studies on the use of fictional narratives in socio-political domains in order to look at the predicament that literary fiction finds itself within a political and economic landscape that has become increasingly fictionalized itself. At a moment when fraudulent narratives increasingly exert magnetism over public discourse and policy decisions themselves, literary fiction finds its natural domain, the unreal world, colonized. By examining narratives that have been influenced by “spin,” propaganda, alternative facts, plagiarism, imposture, and double speak, we will try to localize mechanisms or strategies that offer paths of resistance through what David Castillo and Bill Egginton call “fictional awareness.”

Speakers
avatar for Dimitri Anastasopoulos

Dimitri Anastasopoulos

Associate Professor of English & Director of Creative Writing, University of Buffalo
Dimitri Anastasopoulos is an Associate Professor of English and the Director of the Creative Writing Program at the University at Buffalo. His fiction and articles have appeared in many publications, and he has written two novels, A Larger Sense of Harvey and Farm for Mutes, both... Read More →
avatar for Christine Hume

Christine Hume

Professor of English, Eastern Michigan University
Christine Hume is the author of a lyric memoir in the form of three interlinked essays, Saturation Project (Solid Objects, 2019), as well as three books of poetry. Her chapbooks include Lullaby: Speculations on the First Active Sense (Ugly Duckling Presse); Ventifacts (Omnidawn... Read More →
CM

Christina Milletti

Associate Professor of English, University at Buffalo
Christina Milletti's novel Choke Box: a Fem-Noir was the winner of the 2018 Juniper Prize for Fiction (forthcoming 2019). Her fiction and articles have appeared in many journals and anthologies, such as the Iowa Review (forthcoming), Harcourt's Best New American Voices, The Master's... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
136 DeBartolo Hall

12:00pm EDT

Mediated Narratives
Mediated Narratives is a 75-minute session featuring performative interventions and critical discussions around innovative approaches to fiction, narrativity, and performance across media from the 1970s to today.

The session is organized around key performances by Constance DeJong, who will present an arrangement of selected works dating back to the late 1970s. These excerpted selections form the basis for several thematic and methodological focuses to be explored in the panel: from experimental self-publishing (Modern Love, 1977), to the use of new media technology (Relatives, 1989 and Fantastic Prayers, 1995), to radiophony (from her recent radio series), digital publishing (Nightwriters, 2018) and recombinatory presentations of existing narratives.

DeJong is joined by poet and new media artist Catherine Tyc and art historian and curator Rachel Valinsky, who will respond to and speak alongside each performance with short essays contextualization DeJong’s performances through reflections on key questions around (auto)fiction, performance, and new media from the 1970s to today.

Speakers
CH

Carla Harryman

Eastern Michigan University
Carla Harryman is the author of 20 books of experimental poetry, prose, and performance writing. Her Poets Theater plays, bilingual, and text-based scores have been performed nationally and internationally. Recent publications include Sue in Berlin (2018), a collection of performance... Read More →
IH

Ian Hatcher

Ian Hatcher is a writer, vocalist, performer, and programmer whose work explores cognition in the context of digital systems. He has performed at Artists Space, e-flux, The Kitchen, Fondation Louis Vuitton, the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the Alexandrinsky Theater in St. Petersburg... Read More →
CT

Cat Tyc

Cat Tyc is a Brooklyn based writer and artist. She is the author of the chapbooks, An Achitetural Séance (Dancing Girl Press) and CONSUMES ME (Belladonna*). Her video work has screened locally and internationally at spaces including Microscope Gallery, Anthology Film Archives, the... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
113 DeBartolo

12:00pm EDT

Migrating Texts, Migrating Tongues, a Panel
There is much debate right now about what is or is not owed to and by migrating people attempting to cross borders. We ask, do they have documents? Do they deserve to have documents? What are their reasons? Can they voice their reasons in English? We ask that foreign bodies daring to move closer to us be fully legible (but audible only on our terms). Be willing, ultimately, to be subsumed by a body that is both larger and more narrowly defined.

But our apprehensions about and barriers against Other bodies do not as effectively block other movements. Texts and tongues, too, are bound by sociocultural, political and historical conditions. Nevertheless, they are often able to travel more fluidly and insistently through unfamiliar, unforgiving terrain. What can we learn from their migrations? How might we extend textual multiplicity and lingual elasticity to accommodate migrating entities? Can we document, can we speak and reason in ways that do not strand us or others in places that are hostile and diminishing?

The five women writers and translators on the panel will explore these questions and more, drawing in part on their own work and experiences of migrating. The panelists may be labeled German, Indian, Iranian, and Ugandan, but they live transnationally and multilingually. They write in and of liminal spaces, in and of mutable words, forms and identities. Through their diverse critical and creative approaches, they hope to establish and support wider, better practices of migration and inclusion.

Speakers
KA

Kanika Agrawal

Kanika Agrawal is an Indian citizen and hybrid specimen developed across six countries on four continents. She studied biology at MIT, where she came to love restriction enzymes and fluorescent labeling. She earned an MFA in Writing from Columbia University and a PhD in English/Creative... Read More →
MK

Mildred K Barya

Assistant Professor of Creative Writing and Literature, University of North Carolina - Ashville
Mildred K Barya is Assistant Professor of creative writing and literature at UNC-Asheville, board member of African Writers Trust (AWT) and has published three poetry books, plus short stories in various journals. She holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Denver & blogs... Read More →
YF

Yanara Friedland

Yanara Friedland is a German-American writer, translator, and teacher. Her first book Uncountry: A Mythology was the winner of the 2015 Noemi Press Fiction award. Abraq ad Habra: I will Create As I Speak, a digital chapbook, is available from Essay Press. She is the recipient of research... Read More →
AM

Aditi Machado

Aditi Machado is an Indian poet, translator, and editor of translation. Her books are Some Beheadings (Nightboat, 2017) and a translation, from the French, of Farid Tali’s Prosopopoeia (Action, 2016).  She is the poetry editor for a journal of translation called Asymptote and the... Read More →
PM

Poupeh Missaghi

Assistant Professor in Creative Writing program, Pratt Institute
Poupeh Missaghi is a writer, PersianEnglish translator, and Asymptote’s Iran editor-at-large. She holds a Ph.D. in English/creative writing and an M.A. in translation studies, and currently teaches as a visiting assistant professor at the creative writing program of Pratt Institute... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
131 DeBartolo Hall

12:00pm EDT

Mixed Panel 10
cris cheek, "BAMBIWOLF"

Matthew Cooperman, "NOS"

Erin E. Edwards, "BAMBIWOLF"

Aby Kaupang, "NOS

Speakers
CC

cris cheek

cris cheek is a transatlantic documentary performance writer, sound composer and photographer. He worked alongside Bob Cobbing and Bill Griffiths with the Consortium of London Presses in the mid 1970s to run a thriving open access print shop for indie poets. In 1981 he co-founded... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Cooperman

Matthew Cooperman

Professor of English, Colorado State University
Matthew Cooperman is the author of, most recently, NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified), w/Aby Kaupang, (Futurepoem, 2018), as well as Spool, winner of the New Measure Prize (Free Verse Editions, 2016), Disorder 299.00, w/Aby Kaupang, (Essay Press 2016), the text + image collaboration... Read More →
avatar for Aby Kaupang

Aby Kaupang

Aby Kaupang, author of Little “g” God Grows Tired of Me (SpringGun Press, 2013), Absence is Such a Transparent House (Tebot Bach, 2011) and Scenic Fences | Houses Innumerable (Scantily Clad Press, 2008), has had poems appear in FENCE, La Petite Zine, Dusie, Verse, Denver Quarterly... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
116 DeBartolo Hall

12:00pm EDT

Mixed Panel 11
Abby Burns and Erik Fuhrer, “Queer Collusions”
In our presentation, we will examine five methods of collaborative writing as a form of dialogic exchange across genre and form. These methods will include sequential single writing, parallel writing, remixing, translation, and/or erasure writing, cross-indexing, and revision through obstructions. Through the reading, performance, and discussion of the product of each of these methods, we will begin to consider the disruptive, radical, and productive possibilities of each, as well as their potential challenges, particularly as they relate to deliberately crossing boundaries between poetic and prosaic forms. We will ask how might collaborative writing take us somewhere different? Can generic entanglements produce legible, pleasurable texts? How do divergent writing processes coalesce? Does forcing connections across form create generative or obstructive tension? And in either case, how can writers navigate that tension?
To further contextualize our experience with collaboration, we will end by connecting our experiment to recent collaborative projects, including Traci Brimhall and Brynn Saito’s collection Bright Power, Dark Peace, Wendy Xu and Nick Sturm’s poetry, and others.

Olivia Cronk and Philip Sorenson, “Notes Toward a Z-Axial Poetics”
“Notes Toward a Z-Azial Poetics” is a collaborative, hybrid critical/creative essay that presents a notion/a theory/a poetics. From the essay: The z-axial is a literary mode and a way of reading. It often springs from uncanny, fantastic, speculative texts. Time-travel stories suggest the z-axial; they are a kind of liftoff. However, as with Todorov’s fantastic, the uncanny crashes into “literature,” and all writing becomes potentially z-axial: getting lost, being buried, unveiled, or returning “unchanged” after millennia. The z-axial is a far-out wah-wah-wah: a sine wave, the depth that predicates length and height, a space for potential resistance to white bourgeois presumption. Our goal here is to describe a set of desired effects . . .Our piece considers time-travel, dollhouses, the underworld, memory, shame, gossip, scale, time’s children, between-ness; in other words: we ponder the z-axial as outflow, as necrophilic menace to “sanctioned language.”We seek to present our essay/our z-axial poetics in a multimedia performance. We seek to blend critical and creative presentation conventions. We want to read our piece, but with theatrics: audio-visual effects, the robust claim-making of critical work, and attention to/attempts at the enactment of a z-axial experience right in the room.


Speakers
AB

Abby Burns

Abigail Burns holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Notre Dame. Her short prose uses slipstream literary techniques to engage with queer and feminist theory. She is primarily interested in writing through the liminal space of grief, the interplay of humor and melancholy... Read More →
OC

Olivia Cronk

Olivia Cronk is the author of Louise and Louise and Louise (The Lettered Streets Press, 2016) and Skin Horse (Action Books, 2012). With Philip Sorenson, she edits The Journal Petra. She lives in Chicago and teaches writing at Northeastern Illinois University.
EF

Erik Fuhrer

University of Notre Dame
Erik Fuhrer holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Notre Dame. He is interested in hybridity, generic blurrings, and writing that defies definition. His work has appeared in BlazeVox, Crab Fat Magazine, Noble/Gas Qrtrly, Dream Pop Press, and various other venues... Read More →
PS

Philip Sorenson

Philip Sorenson is the author of two full-length collections, Of Embodies (Rescue Press, 2012) and Solar Trauma (Rescue Press, 2018), and a forthcoming shorter work, New Recordings (Another New Calligraphy, 2018). He is the co-editor, with Olivia Cronk, of The Journal Petra.


Sunday October 7, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
129 DeBartolo Hall

12:00pm EDT

Noemi Press' Akrilica Series: How Latinx Paint Ourselves. A Collaborative
Since 2013, the Akrilica Series, a co-publishing venture between Noemi Press and Letras Latinas—the literary initiative at the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame, has published poetry collections showcasing innovative Latinx writing. Celebrating the five-year anniversary of the series, this retrospective considers the questions: What is Latinx innovative poetry? How do Latinx poets resist hegemonic power by insisting on the lyric moment? And, what does this do to the futures they embody and the past they remember on the page? Celebrating the award-winning books published in the last five years, this presentation will collaboratively construct a reading, analysis, and presentation, where the aesthetic concerns of Latinx writers will be investigated and challenged using Border lenses and Latinx futurism criticism. All ultimately celebrating the insistence upon being present that the Akrilica Series conveys for innovative Latinx writing.

Speakers
LE

Lauren Espinoza

Arizona State University
Lauren Espinoza earned her MFA in Poetry at Arizona State University and her MAIS in Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley. Her poetry has appeared in New Border Voices: An Anthology, The Acentos Review, As/Us, Pilgrimage, Sinister Wisdom, and elsewhere... Read More →
SF

Suzi F. Garcia

Suzi F. Garcia is Noemi Press' Poetry Editor, and is is a poet in the MFA Program at the University of Notre Dame, where she writes about feelings and feminism. Her work can be found in the Yalobusha Review, the Pinch Journal, NAP LOG II, Word Riot, and more. You can find her at... Read More →
CG

Carmen Giménez Smith

Professor of English in Creative Writing MFA program, Virginia Tech University
Carmen Giménez Smith is Noemi Press' Publisher, and the author of a memoir and four poetry collections— including Milk and Filth, finalist for the 2013 NBCC award in poetry. Her memoir, Bring Down the Little Birds, received an American Book Award. A CantoMundo Fellow, she is Professor... Read More →
VA

Vanessa Angélica Villarreal

University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Vanessa Angélica Villarreal was born in the Rio Grande Valley borderlands to formerly undocumented Mexican immigrants. She is the author of the collection Beast Meridian (Noemi Press, Akrilica Series, 2017), winner of the John A. Robertson Award for Best First Book of Poetry from... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
138 DeBartolo Hall

12:00pm EDT

Revolutions: Poetic/Visual/Critical Collaboration in Performance
This event will be a performance, and discussion, of a collaboration between poet John Matthias, printmaker Jean Dibble, and critic Robert Archambeau. It is based on their book Revolutions: A Collaboration, which reworks texts and events from the Russian modernist Osip Mandelstam in three genres, setting up conversations between past and present, Russia and America, modernism and contemporary experiment, the visual and the verbal, the creative and the critical. Matthias' poetic sequence revisits Mandelstam, finding parallels with his own experiences, while Dibble and Archambeau respond to Matthias' work. The three will perform sections of their book-length collaboration, then discuss the process of working together across genres in an all-too-rare collaborative process.

Speakers
RA

Robert Archambeau

Robert Archambeau is a poet and critic, the author of three books of criticism and two of poetry as well as the editor of several critical books, including "Word Play Place: Essays on the Poetry of John Matthias."  The recipient of grants and awards from the Swedish Academy, the... Read More →
JD

Jean Dibble

Jean Dibble is a printmaker and professor of art at Notre Dame.  She has an extensive history of international exhibitions over the past four decades, and her collaborations with John Matthias have been displayed at the Poetry Foundation.  Her work frequently involves the intersection... Read More →
JM

John Matthias

John Matthias is the author of dozens of books of poetry and prose, as well as the editor of literary anthologies and works of criticism.  A longtime editor for the Notre Dame Review and professor of English at Notre Dame, his work is the subject of two critical books.  He has collaborated... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
140 DeBartolo Hall

12:00pm EDT

Chance & Violence
The encounter with violence can appear to momentarily abolish chance (where trauma inscribes itself as Fate on those trying to make sense of what happened), or turn the unexpected into a permanent source of terror (leading to the isolation and oppression of portions of the population perceived / described as threat). Responding to the contemporary sacrifice of freedoms and the embrace of fascism, this panel takes on the question of chance and violence to examine the consequences of responses to fear and loss, and explore creative alternatives. Note: the participants will use dice to shape an unpredictable and unique event involving an interactive mash-up rather than clear “turns” / secured borders between four performances.

The Rape Kit: an evidentiary apparatus that names some perps, asking: what is the on-going impact of the violence, how do lingering images change memory, and intimacy, after?

Crimes Against Love: memorializes those lost to homophobic murders, pairing photographs of damaged ancient sculptures with micro narratives. The work struggles to remember: to fight the concerted effort to minimize, dilute, and erase.

Watch Yourself: a mixed-media performance exploring the hyper-vigilant double-consciousness toggling between security guard and security risk / threat, engaging the emotional consequences of attempting to feel “safe.”

Animus: Gestures in the racialized song of a piece of black netting tacked to a wall, the costume of the encrypted accretion of an older man shooter, interpretation of the unchecked proliferator: white bomber, boyfriend, liar. A sonic/ dance/ visual act amongst friends.

Speakers
avatar for Cyriaco Lopes

Cyriaco Lopes

Associate Professor - Deputy Chair of Art & Music, John Jay - CUNY
Cyriaco Lopes is a NYC–based Brazilian artist. He has exhibited in the Museum of Modern Art in Rio, the Museum of Art of São Paulo, El Museo in NYC, the Contemporary Art Museum in Saint Louis, etc.  He is an associate professor and Deputy Chair of the Art & Music Department at... Read More →
LM

Laura Mullen

Laura Mullen is the author of eight books: Complicated Grief was published in 2015. Recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in the anthologies Poesia Visual 5, and Ritual and Capital. An artist’s book, Verge (a collaboration with John David O’Brien) was produced in 2018, and... Read More →
RV

Ronaldo V. Wilson

Ronaldo V. Wilson, PhD, is the author of Narrative of the Life of the Brown Boy and the White Man (University of Pittsburgh, 2008), winner of the 2007 Cave Canem Prize., Poems of the Black Object (Futurepoem Books, 2009), winner of the Thom Gunn Award for Gay Poetry and the Asian... Read More →
TW

Terri Witek

Terri Witek is the author most recently of The Rape Kit, winner of the 2017 Slope Editions Prize judged by Dawn Lundy Martin. Her poetry often traces the breakages between words and images, and she has collaborated with Brazilian visual artist Cyriaco Lopes (cyriacolopes.com) since... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
117 DeBartolo Hall

12:00pm EDT

“We, Too:” Fiction Writers Reclaiming Violence Under a Hostile Political Regime
Central to the organization of the “Me, Too” movement is the assumption that trans and cis women are frequently victims of cis male violence. Yet fictionalized depictions of violence remain a staple of mainstream male literary achievement, while women’s literary depictions of violence are frequently marginalized, dismissed as autobiographical or excessive. What if one response to the “Me, Too” movement’s call to action was to speak openly of violence, not only through autobiographical posts and hashtags, but through fictional characters and poetic personas, reclaiming violence for our literary swords? Through a roundtable discussion with brief illustrative readings from authors’ original violent works-in-progress, this panel will examine rationales and strategies for depicting violence in literary contexts, as well as the potential consequences for women writers. Crucial to our reclaiming of violence as a literary strategy is our insistence on viewing the word “woman” through an intersectional lens, reflecting our racial, ethnic, gender, sexual, and class differences, and the complexity of speaking our truth under a hostile political regime.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Blackman

Sarah Blackman

Sarah Blackman is the Director of Creative Writing at the Fine Arts Center, a public arts high school in Greenville, South Carolina where she lives with the poet John Pursley, III and their two daughters. She is the founding editor of Crashtest, an online magazine for high-school... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Natalya Fink

Jennifer Natalya Fink

Georgetown University
Jennifer Natalya Fink is the author of five critically acclaimed novels, including the Dana Award-winning The Mikvah Queen and Lambda-finalist and Doctorow-prize winning Bhopal Dance. She is an associate professor at Georgetown University, where she teaches creative writing and co-founded... Read More →
avatar for Courtney E. Morgan

Courtney E. Morgan

Courtney E. Morgan is the author of The Seven Autopsies of Nora Hanneman (FC2, 2017). Her writing has also appeared in Pleiades, Lunch Ticket, American Book Review, and others. She was awarded a fellowship to the DISQUIET Literary Program and is a recipient of the Thompson Award for... Read More →
avatar for Aimee Parkison

Aimee Parkison

Associate Professor of Fiction Writing, Oklahoma State University
Aimee Parkison is the author of Refrigerated Music for a Gleaming Woman, which won the FC2 Catherine Doctorow Innovative Fiction Prize. Parkison teaches in the Creative Writing Program at Oklahoma State University and has published five books of fiction.


Sunday October 7, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
102 DeBartolo Hall